Initially daily but now sporadic blog about anime and world animation with a specific focus on the artists behind the work. Written by Ben Ettinger.
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Monday, March 3, 2014

12:30:00 pm , 1083 words, 4800 views     Categories: TV, Space Dandy

Space Dandy #9

Dandy teleports down to a planet overrun by sentient plants who have organized themselves into nations, replete with spies and aggressively guarded borders, but his search for a rare alien instead turns up the secret to the planet...

I have a new favorite episode. This episode was a very different beast from what came before, but it was a sheer delight and is easily the most consummately crafted episode of the bunch so far.

Organic, colorful, hand-drawn - all words that spring to mind for this unique episode that really feels like the creation of someone with a strong artistic vision. A delight to behold because of its riot of beautiful otherworldly visuals, it has the hand-drawn feeling of the Michio Mihara episode, and was crammed from start to finish with creative ideas and pleasing visual schemes.

The characters looked quite different in the hands of the staff here, and even the atmosphere was different from what we've grown used to; the silly gags and irony are absent and the story is told at more of a remove, both in terms of staging of shots and the more restrained style of directing. But the pacing, humor, characters, animation, music and backgrounds all work so well together that the episode that you're too busy enjoying it to care. Certain moments gave me goosebumps because of the perfectly beautiful combination of otherworldly music, colors and shapes.

Eunyoung Choi is the creative brain behind the episode, having come up with the idea for the story (which was then written by Shinichiro Watanabe), designed the aliens, done the conceptual art (settei), and storyboarded and directed. She's one of the most talented people to emerge from the Masaaki Yuasa group alongside Michio Mihara, and already proved that she can go it alone on that episode of Wakfu that I mentioned in the previous post.

The creatures in the episode are among the most fascinating in the show so far. Rather than just one or two new aliens, we're regaled with an entire planet populated by creatures that seem like a blend of plants and microorganisms. With membranes and receptors that allow passage only to certain microbes and not others, and strange creatures matter-of-factly going about their strange business, the episode feels like a cross between Fantastic Planet and Fantastic Voyage.

This episode works splendidly well because you come away feeling like it's thoroughly explored the world of the characters. It feels real. Much of the episode's runtime is devoted to depicting in meticulous detail the interaction between the planet's plant inhabitants, like some kind of alien nature channel program. It's like in Planete Sauvage - you don't know the logic underpinning the crazy interaction of all these bizarre alien life forms, but it feels like there IS some logic there, and together they form a living ecosystem.

The nice part is that these things aren't overexplained, and yet you don't feel like they're underexplained. If the goal of this series was to regale us with a bewildering array of colorful alien creatures, this episode feels like the one that delivered the best in this regard, because it creates a whole planet that feels like it is actual pulsing with various life forms that are all interconnected. The episode actually takes the time to show us snippets of this interaction in a way that evokes the bigger picture. You really feel like you're in Dandy's shoes, recoiling at a bizarre creature and gazing in awe at a beautiful scene as he explores the new world.

And in the midst of all that, Eunyoung actually achieves the unlikely feat of making us invest in the strange plant creatures like the little one and her 'father'. The ending was actually surprisingly moving. The side-story about Meow meanwhile was amusing and added some variety to the proceedings while Dandy was on his adventure learning about the planet. So the episode isn't just artsy and quirky, love it or leave it - it has humor and heart too. It's a very likeable episode.

The episode even had something of a musical interlude, though it was very well done and didn't come across as an overt Disney-style musical interlude. In fact, the music of this episode was exceptional. With lots of odd noodly electronic soundscapes and a capella warbling, it was unusually organically linked to the goings-on, as if it had been specially commissioned for this episode. This is the first episode where the music felt simultaneously so beautiful and well integrated.

When I saw the preview I originally thought it was the Masaaki Yuasa episode, and many parts of the episode remind of his style. The episode felt like it could have come straight out of Kaiba. The visual style, with its weird colors and gradients, also reminded me of Cat Soup. This is perhaps due to a combination of the fact that Eunyoung has worked with him for so long and that the backgrounds were all drawn by Kevin Aymeric (tumblr), who was the art director of Yuasa's Kick Heart and is an incredibly talented and flexible artist. Look for more from this great talent in Masaaki Yuasa's upcoming Ping Pong.

(In a side-note, as a big fan of Disasterpeace, I bought The Floor is Jelly game when it came out to support him and because it looked awesome (and is), but I was surprised to find just now that the beautiful cover art was drawn by Kevin Aymeric.)

The sakkan was Kiyotaka Oshiyama, who first came to my attention for his work on Denno Coil. I don't know his style well, but the characters here are very uniquely drawn, with the sort of meandering, organic line that I associate with Yuasa. It works very well for the plant creatures in this episode. Dandy looks quite different from previous episodes, but the drawings are fantastically well done, and if anything he looks even more yankee Elvis than before. The lines of the characters bulge and twist in different directions in a stylized way that reminds me of a Yuasa production.

A bevy of talented animators helped bring the episode to life - Gosei Oda, Norifumi Kugai, Cedric Herole, Ikuro Kuwana - but I can't distinguish their work. Anyway it's not like in some episodes where the animation isn't particularly interesting most of the time except for certain highlights of good animation - every single shot of animation is pleasing to watch in this episode. This is a great example of an episode that is a perfectly balanced whole.

Sunday, February 23, 2014

04:47:00 pm , 1081 words, 5269 views     Categories: TV, Space Dandy

Space Dandy #8

Dandy & co land on a machine planet where they find a lone dog that may or not be Laika, which gives them some unexpected stowaways when they finally leave...

The series is hitting its stride around this point, as every episode is now totally solid, with almost no room for complaint, even though each episode is quite different from the previous. Each ep is headed by a very talented creator, and the template of this series allows them to shine in a way that I haven't seen many of them shine in quite a while.

Hiroshi Shimizu puts on an impressive show as storyboarder/director/sakkan of this episode written by Cowboy Bebop/Tokyo Godfathers screenwriter Keiko Nobumoto. Both are very talented in their own right, and working together they create a fun little episode.

Hiroshi Shimizu is an underrated animator, and this episode illustrates that well. This episode had the most lively character animation of any episode thus far, although the Telecom-ish episode 2 had a lot of lively character animation. Mihara's episode 6 was more quirky and interesting than necessarily conventionally lively and entertaining the way this one was. Other episodes have had sparks of life at various moments, but this episode was full of vivid, entertaining, cartoonish character animation from start to finish.

The drawings and animation style are quite different from the usual, but the style is never jarring or unpleasant. Every episode so far has given its unique twist to the characters, like in the good old days of anime, when part of the fun of watching a show was looking out for each sakkan's style. I prefer this approach to the 'chief animation director' approach that irons out inconsistencies. The style of the movement in this episode, with the characters running around the entire frame in long shots, reminded me of classic Oh Pro/Telecom style Lupin, particularly episode 49 of pink jacket Lupin by Oh Pro, which featured Hiroshi Shimizu himself in an early gig. The last scene of this episode, with a crazed QT chasing Dandy and Meow, was the highlight in this regard.

I'd say this is my favorite episode so far, mostly because the characters are more expressive and lively than they have been, which makes them seem to have more personality than usual. I love Dandy's expressions in this episode. Even Meow and QT seem to have more personality, bounding about happily when they arrive on the surface. The story is also a little more down to earth and straightforward, without the over-the-top randomness of the other episodes. I like both approaches, but this episode was a refreshing change. The series can sometimes seem to try a little too hard for effect, and this one has a nice balance in that sense. Rather than flat-out parody like the zombie episode, or the sharp and clever storytelling of episode 2, it's a simple story with subtle charm. The plotline about the famous Laika was compelling and poignant in an understated and not overtly tearjerking kind of way. And the episode has an interesting dual structure, about the dog in the first half, and evolving out of that into something completely different in the second half.

As unique as the style is in this episode, I think Hiroshi Shimizu is not as well known as he should be because he usually doesn't have a particularly idiosyncratic style, unlike some animators whose work looks the same from project to project. All I know is that whenever he's involved, you can expect some seriously solid quality and lively animation. His versatility and professionalism as an animator has ironically meant that he doesn't get as much attention as people limited to one style. But obviously people in the industry know how good he is, because he's been in demand in a huge variety of productions for decades now, including A Tree of Palme, Cat Soup, FLCL, Jin-Roh, Millennium Actress, A Letter To Momo, Colorful, and Sword of the Stranger.

Hiroshi Shimizu started out at Oh Pro in the 1980s, and I've noted his presence in the various Oh Pro productions that I've written about such as pink jacket Lupin III (1985) and Devilman (1990). He became a regular in Ghibli movies as well as Shin-chan movies, which is presumably where he encountered Masaaki Yuasa, as he soon also became a regular in Yuasa productions, storyboarding, directing and sakkan'ing episode 11 of Kemonozume (2006) and sakkan'ing episode 8 of Tatami Galaxy (2010).

Around that time, he headed the character side of Sayo Yamamoto's TV series directing debut Michiko & Hacchin (2008), as well as working on her next production Lupin III: Mine Fujiko (2012) as sakkan of episode 4. He had also worked on Samurai Champloo, so there is a lot of connection with the staff of Space Dandy that make his involvement a no-brainer.

Since around the time of the Wakfu bonus episode headed by Choi Eunyoung at the Japanese branch of French studio Anakama, Shimizu has been working with French animators, and most recently he has been involved with a new French studio called Yapiko Animation (web site, twitter) headed by French animators but also involving some Japanese talent. Two French animators from the studio are involved in this episode - Eddie Mehong and Cédric Herole - making this something of a preview of what's to come from Yapiko Animation, which has several projects in development.

The episode is staffed by an interesting array of animators who are talented in a less flamboyant way than the animators who tend to get attention from fans. Tadashi Hiramatsu needs no introduction. He is great at lively acting as well as exciting action. Though he has been associated mostly with Gainax for a while now, he actually started out at Nakamura Pro (viz Dragon Slayer) and so his style isn't entirely defined by the Gainax Style, which I like as it gives him more versatility to work on various projects like this and not stick out. Kanako Maru I don't know much about except that the solo episode she did in episode 18 of Casshern Sins was excellent. Toru Yoshida is the great Anime R animator who debuted with a bang in Votoms and has since gone on to be impressively prolific. He is not limited to mecha/effects and even does character animation, but I'm guessing did the launch of the Sputnik lookalike, which was interesting for its wobbly trajectory befitting a DIY junk rocket. Others include Kei Hyodo and Yuichi Nakazawa. Yuichi Nakazawa is part of the post-Toru Yoshida generation of animators at Anime R.

Sunday, February 16, 2014

06:54:00 pm , 901 words, 4744 views     Categories: TV, Space Dandy

Space Dandy #7

Dandy joins a no-holds-barred space race out of petty jealousy and winds up getting transported into the distant future...

Packed head to toe with nonstop hilarity and action, this was one of the best episodes yet. This episode provides exactly what I want to see from Space Dandy: Solid entertainment, sheer idiocy, and irreproachable quality.

Redline and Wacky Races spring to mind as comparisons, but there are no shortage of predecessors in the venerable crazy racing genre, and this episode delivers everything you could want in such an episode. A parade of colorful enemies battle it out with one outrageous-looking racecar after another along a perilous racecourse offering a variety of different obstacles. Solid production values keep this episode afloat, with strong animation and visuals generally, and solid directing that keep things racing through to the end with plenty of twists and turns. With its ludicrous designs like a giant flying heel and a rocket in the shape of an enormous boob, it also reminds the tastelessly silly mecha in classic Tatsunoko shows.

Goro Taniguchi storyboards and So Toyama directs. Taniguchi's first big job as a director was in 1999 at Sunrise with Infinite Ryvius, an underappreciated sci-fi Lord of the Flies, before he went on to direct the excellent Planetes in 2003, and then Code Geass, which I haven't seen but is presumably what he's best known for now. (The whole Planetes/Geass team is present here, if you add Ichiro Okochi from the previous episode.) He appears to have been storyboarding mostly in the last few years, and he shows off his chops here. I'm not as familiar with Toyama, but the episode has great polish, so he did an impeccable job bringing Taniguchi's board to life.

Writer Kimiko Ueno is putting in quite an impressive showing. This is her third script to date. I loved the twist she pulled at the end by turning the heartthrob bidanshi cliche on its head and making the prince fall for Dandy. She was a good choice for this episode, as there are lots of other fun bits that prove she's Dai Sato's spiritual successor. When the S&M racer girl begins demonstrating what seems to be various sex positions, the announcer rushes in to tell the kiddies that she's just demonstrating her "combat moves". She nails Dandy's lovable but craven showoff personality - he goes for his "last resort" right at the beginning of the race. Was that an Ideon reference when the planet gets split in half near the end?

Topping a crazy and silly episode off is one of the more trippy and mind-bending endings yet, with Dandy traveling into the future after having a homoerotic space collision only to encounter a Dandy Buddha?! The episode ends with a "The End" credit, again implying that the story starts anew with each episode. Although it would be entertaining if all of these tantalizing clues being dropped about parallel universes or whatever turned out to be nothing but MacGuffins there just to yank the chain of speculation-prone viewers, I'm curious to see if the show begins to tie all of these threads at some point later in the series in a way that makes sense.

All of the characters had their moments to shine, even the baddies, and the episode is filled with amusing touches. The most obvious was the periodic title card with singsong "Dandy" cutting between scenes in the style of a classic cartoon, which was a great touch in the spirit of the show.

Chiba Yuriko, designer of Planetes, acts as sakkan, and does a great job, as the drawings of the characters throughout are flawless. The prince was rendered immaculately beautiful, befitting his sparkles, and Dandy's yankee attitude came out particularly nicely in his various expressions. Series designer Yoshiyuki Ito was brought in to design the character, which makes sense, as he is good at creating bikei characters like this where delicacy of line is of the essence. Bones regular and mecha specialist Eiji Nakata is co-credited as sakkan, so he presumably oversaw the mecha. I was thinking he probably did the shot in the opening with the mecha of increasing size, and that we'd probably be seeing him appear in the inevitable mecha-themed episode.

The episode featured an even bigger designer cast than usual due to the requirements to design so many vehicles and racers. One surprise name was Hiroyuki Imaishi, who took time off from his own show to design some hilariously ridiculous spaceships, like the one with a truck for a nipple/cockpit, and the waitress's nudemobile with boobs for headlights and butt for a fender. It appears that his rough designs weren't used as is, though, but were cleaned up by mecha designer Fumihiro Katagai. Takuhito Kusanagi designed the flower announcer alien this time around, which is an amusing blend of sunflower and flamenco dancer. He had quite a bit of screen time this time.

I couldn't pin down much of the animation, but there was plenty of nice work. Yutaka Nakamura is the most prominent name in the credits, but there are other talented animators - Jun Okuda, Mamoru Yasuhiko, Koichi Shimoda, Kazumi Inadome, Johei Ohara, and Tetsuro Tamaki. They're names I see often but I don't know their work well enough to identify it. Hiroyuki Mori, Yuichi Nakazawa and Tomohiro Takayama presumably worked on the mecha. Johei Ohara goes way back, having been a designer on Birth in 1984.

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Sunday, February 16, 2014

12:05:00 am , 1152 words, 3894 views     Categories: TV, Space Dandy

Space Dandy #6

On a lonely planet somewhere, an old war has raged for centuries. Down to only one on each side, they battle on, even though they can't even remember the reason why the war started. Dandy tries to bring peace, but it's in vain - their ideological differences prove too great. Dandy surfs off into the sunset on a space wave as the planet explodes into a million pieces.

This is easily the most offbeat episode the show has given us so far. Previous episodes fell generally within the norm in terms of character behavior and storytelling styles, but this episode is more out there, more indie, more handmade. Darkly humorous, deadpan but goofy, with weird drawings and a weirder story, it's a classic Michio Mihara episode.

It's almost a tradition for there to be a Michio Mihara episode in each Masaaki Yuasa's TV shows - Kemonozume #12 (2006), Kaiba #4 (2008), Tatami Galaxy #10 (2010) - but this episode breaks the tradition by coming in a non-Yuasa show. All of those shows were produced by Madhouse, and I mentioned before how ex-Madhouse people were heavily involved here, so perhaps it makes sense that Mihara's next solo show would come in Space Dandy. Yuasa himself will be doing an episode later on.

Mihara didn't actually animate the whole thing, but he did do most of it. The only other animator credited is the talented Hironori Tanaka, who obviously animated the surfing at the end. It's an odd pairing - they have totally different styles - but the surfing bit is really beautiful, even if it doesn't really match Mihara's style. Mihara storyboarded, directed, was sakkan (which doesn't mean anything since he was the only animator and he obviously didn't correct Tanaka's part), came up with the story, and did the concept art for the episode, not to mention designing the two guest aliens. He didn't inbetween this time. Dai Sato wrote the script based on Mihara's idea. Mihara is a self-admitted idol singer fanatic, and I'm assuming it was his idea to get two girls from LinQ to supervise the lyrics of the song that plays over the surfing bit at the end of the episode. So all in all, definitely another big job from Mihara, even if he didn't technically animate everything. It's got his fingerprints on everything and feels like a wonderfully high-proof Mihara short.

This is a weird episode in every sense, matching Mihara's weird sensibility. The underwear zealot aliens, the space surfing. Borderline unsettling was the part where Dandy and the alien lie in bed in their underwear - not too sure what to make of that. It's not entertaining in a conventional sense, but that's what makes it appealing - it's more quirky and cult.

The neighbor feud setup is classic and simple, and universal. It doesn't lampoon any specific conflict, but it captures the absurdity of many of them, especially the prominent religious-fueled ones. The moment where the two aliens can barely contain their revulsion as they're struggling to put on the other's item of clothing, while Dandy looks on bemused, was particularly well observed. Entire nations wage wars against one another for things that, to the rest of the world, seem utterly trivial and meaningless. The two aliens waging war over whether they should wear underwear or vests is a ridiculous and silly concept, until you think about the real world and realize that people kill one another every day over absurd things that would make two aliens fighting over underwear seem utterly banal. In that sense this episode has a nice satirical bite to it that makes the episode feel a little more beefy and three-dimensional and relevant. That's something the other episodes have been lacking. I also like that this episode isn't afraid to have a bit more of a dark and cynical edge while still being funny about it and not taking itself seriously.

Mihara's drawings aren't quite as distinctive here as they sometimes are, so he was obviously keeping things toned down a bit. Dandy looks surprisingly on-model if you don't scrutinize the lines too closely, although you can still identify Mihara's touch in the characteristic crooked gape and thick lips his characters always have. His characters feel more three-dimensional and meaty, with all sorts of bulges and crevices that shift as a character moves around, all done using a minimum of lines. Dandy is in nothing but shorts the whole episode, which reminds of his episode of Kemonozume, where he showed off his skill at animating the naked (male) physical form in all sorts of configurations.

Mihara's characters act out their emotions like actors in silent movies, pulling all sorts of faces, tilting their head back when taken aback, puckering their lips when perplexed. It's a very fun and melodramatic kind of character animation so different from any other animator in Japan or elsewhere. It's an odd combination of realism in the drawing/movement and theatricality in the acting. The movement is recognizable as Mihara - using few drawings, but moving the body more creative and humorously flexible manner than the usual animator. He's got quirks in his acting, such as this way of tilting of the head back while talking, that identify him even when his drawings don't as much. The backgrounds had a very hand-drawn feeling to them, but Mihara isn't credited with actual background art, only for "bijutsu settei", so I'm not sure how it was done. They definitely look like his drawings.

The alien designs remind slightly of the alien he designed in the ramen episode. They're typical Mihara in that they're a bizarre combination of cute and ugly. They're sinewy, like bodies with the skin removed, but with these big lobster eyes and batty eyelashes. They hate each other, but they look like nothing more than an alien Abbott and Costello, so right up until the point that they bludgeon one another to death, it's hard to take them seriously. The design isn't that creative per se - they're basically bipedal beings, like us, rather than some weird new kind of creature - but the tentacle arms and the rest of the details that make the designs alien and unique are actually depicted at some length in animation, so the creatures come away feeling more alive and believable. Not many of the aliens in the show have benefited from such generous animated treatment.

The ending with Dandy surfing away from the exploding planet was downright cartoonish in its complete abandonment of even a facade of realism. Nerds who nitpicked Gravity would surely have an aneurysm. It doesn't make any sense, but it sure as hell looks cool. Now that is the kind of sublime idiocy I expect of the great Dai Sato.

If they can do a Michio Mihara episode and it still feels like Space Dandy, it would be nice to see an equally raw and unfiltered episode by Osamu Kobayashi, but he wasn't announced, so that's probably not in the cards.

Sunday, February 16, 2014

12:05:00 am , 697 words, 3519 views     Categories: TV, Space Dandy

Space Dandy #5

Dandy begrudgingly plays babysitter to a little girl alien and turns out to be a softie after all.

Mappa produced this episode as well as ep 3, but this one is very different in that it doesn't scream Madhouse pedigree at all. Instead it's headed by Akemi Hayashi. Ichiro Okochi writes. I associate Akemi Hayashi mostly with Gainax although she's done lots of other stuff. The reason for using Mappa is obvious, since Watanabe produced his previous TV show there, and it's nice to see them getting to do more creative work, as Kids on the Slope was nice but hardly a showcase of outlandish creative ideas. That's one nice thing about Space Dandy: it gives animators a whole new set of designs/situations in each episode to be creative with, even if the base characters are the same.

This ep is different from what came before because, for good or ill, it bears the strong imprint of its director. The good thing about Space Dandy is that it clearly offers its episode directors a little more freedom than usual in doing their thing, but the downside is that sometimes a director's style will just not be your cup of tea. That was the case for me here. This was hands down my least favorite ep so far. I appreciated the Paris, Texas vibe it had going, but overall it just didn't work for me. The wit and unpredictability of the previous scripts was replaced with a sequence of predictable setups of the two goofing off and bonding in an that attempts to tug at the heartstrings, but I just found it rote and empty. I didn't find it moving or cute at all, mostly because the kid just seemed like an empty cipher without any real personality. It's ironic because I was just starting to think the show needed to inject some heart and feelings into the proceedings. The action scene at the end was also weak and unconvincing.

The animation was decent, but never stood out as extraordinary. The sakkan was Tomohiro Kishi. It looked different from the previous episodes, as if there was more of an emphasis on line and contour and folds. The animation felt like it had a more Gainax-derived style of acting and deformation. It wasn't badly done, and had considerable effort put in to bring the different shots alive, but personally I preferred the Telecom-school acting of ep 2. Takeshi Honda was the only notable animator involved. I suppose he did the part in the train station where the girl throws the doll and gets accosted by the bounty hunters, as movement of the girl walking away has that distinctive Honda swagger and bounce. The side shot of Dandy walking looking at the piece of paper was nice. It was one of the better animated shots of Dandy I've seen because, like the Ryan Larkin short, it conveyed personality entirely through gait. But other than that, most of the animation didn't do anything for me. I didn't know any of the names in the credits aside from Honda, so perhaps this was a Mappa young animator training episode, in which case I don't mind cutting them some slack.

Takuhito Kusanagi's Dune-inspired trench digger was the most interesting part of the episode for me - or it should have been, but it got literally one shot of animation, and you could barely see the design at all in that shot. Pretty disappointing, and a waste of good design work. It's great to get all these people to come up with interesting alien designs, but also somewhat disappointing that most of them just pass by in a single quick crowd shot without getting any kind of animation whatsoever. There are some fun designs in the crowd pictured above. I certainly would have preferred seeing how these characters might move than seeing the boring, cutesy alien girl in this episode for 20 minutes straight. One thing that got me wondering was: What are those things on the tips of her fingers for? The designer must have thought about it. It seems sloppy not to give the paraphernalia a semblance of usefulness if you're going to have it there.

Saturday, February 8, 2014

07:52:00 pm , 754 words, 3705 views     Categories: TV, Space Dandy

Space Dandy #4

This solidly produced episode finds us in zombieland. Shinichiro Watanabe seems to like the zombie genre, because Samurai Champloo had a zombie episode. Dandy ramps up the episodic genre parodying aspect of Champloo with an even more aggressive bent and silly extremes. It's a simple structure on which to build a series but it makes for enjoyable variety.

The previous episode ended with Meow dead, and as expected, this time we start over as if nothing had happened. This episode ends with the entire world turned into zombies, and presumably we'll hit the reset button again next episode. This seems to reinforce the idea that every episode is a parallel universe or something. Not the first time this sort of thing has been done in anime, but I like how in this case it just makes the show feel more like a cartoon adventure where they're just sloppy and aren't very good at continuity, rather than some high-concept postmodern headscratcher.

The episode was goofy entertainment. Don't seek any deep message or sophisticated storytelling here. This is pure parody at its best. The episode builds in suspense until the midpoint, when it seems as if only Dandy is going to make it, and then veers in a completely different direction in the second half. What happens when everyone finally gets turned into a zombie? Universal peace. Writer Kimiko Ueno again does a great job with the material. Yogurt gives Dandy the clue he needs to turns the negative of being a zombie into a positive: He's not rotting, he's fermenting. Not sure if it works as well in English. The final card was a genuine LOL moment.

The drawings were nice and solid throughout thanks presumably to sakkan Tomohisa Shimoyama. His drawings aren't as detail-oriented or stylish as the designer Yoshiyuki Ito, but they've got a good sense of cartoonish stylization. There were a few bits of animation that stood out as being above average, namely the part where the mercenaries attack the hospital and the part immediately following where Dandy feeds QT to the zombies. I'm guessing the first part was done by Shintaro Doge due to the wobbly, loose style of drawing and movement that seems like a cross between Yasunori Miyazawa and Shinya Ohira, and the second by Toshiyuki Sato with its slightly more Kanada inspired timing. But according to the official web site, Shintaro Doge designed the zombie hunter, so maybe he animated that part instead. French animator Eddie Mehong was also involved.

The storyboard/directing wasn't done by one person for once. The storyboard was by Namimi Sanjo, which is the pen name of Hitoshi Namba. The directing was by Ikuro Sato. I wasn't familiar with either, but I see that both have been active since the late 80s and are regulars in Bones productions every year. Hitoshi Namba debuted at Telecom as an inbetweener on Cagliostro no less. Ikuro Sato has been working exclusively as an episode director (not storyboarding) for Bones since it began, and even worked on Cowboy Bebop. The episode doesn't have the sort of idiosyncratic finish it might had a single person with a strong style done both tasks, but instead the episode has professional polish.

I've now discovered that the official website is uploading a few of the alien designs for each episode, with credits, which is great, as I was wondering with each episode who designed what. I've been a fan of Takuhito Kusanagi since his manga Shanghai Kaijinzoku came out in 1994, and it's great to see that he continues to work, even if just as a designer. I remember him being a major design contributor to Samurai Seven. His design work on Dandy is probably the most impressive of the lot from what I've seen so far, with daunting detailing and creatively conceived creatures. His design for the "trench maker" in ep 5 is particularly impressive. In this episode he designed the doctor who examines Dandy, but the character animation was more perfunctory than I would have liked. I'd like to see his organic, entangled designs get some classically detailed animation for at least a few shots. His designs look great on paper but don't fare well in the transition to the simple lines and flat colors of anime and wind up looking a little crudely rendered. He's got a great design aesthetic. I wish we could see a whole short anime done with a hand-drawn touch that did justice to his unique style, although the very nature of his style makes that difficult.

Friday, February 7, 2014

01:49:00 pm , 842 words, 2411 views     Categories: TV, Space Dandy

Space Dandy #3

This episode was like a cross between a creature feature and the classic trope of space hero saving damsel in distress from hideous aliens. Dandy crash-lands on an alien planet in search of a Boobies before his stamp card expires, but instead finds a pack of ravenous aliens chasing a stranded girl. He runs to the rescue, ray gun ablaze, but all is not as it seems: She transforms into an enormous many-mammaried monster who wants to eat them. The seemingly ravenous aliens were just trying warn him. Irony begets irony as the boob monster who foiled their Boobies run turns out to be a rare alien who wins them the prize money they need to eat at Boobies.

Writer Kimiko Ueno does a nice job with the material, weaving many levels of irony and boobies into the narrative, and throwing amusing curve-balls like the sudden shift into giant robo battle mode and the horrifying looking aliens who turn out to be good guys with country bumpkin accents. I wasn't familiar with her because she just started writing a few years ago, but I see that she co-wrote last year's Shin-chan movie together with nonsense gag master Yoshio Urasawa. I haven't watched those movies in a few years, but I'd like to see that.

This episode was a bit of a step down in quality from the previous episode. There was nothing egregiously bad about it, and it was still entertaining, but it was a little less tight in terms of the directing, especially compared to Sayo Yamamoto's versatile work on ep 2. The drawings also felt a little slack, but the quality never dipped to an unacceptable level.

Hiroshi Hamasaki is the storyboarder/director, and he does a good job bring alive the horror factor around where the girl transforms into a giant boob monster, which is perhaps no surprise coming from a onetime Yoshiaki Kawajiri associate. He is also credited as guest alien designer, so perhaps he even designed the monster. I don't know who designed the girl, but she is an amusing parody of cute moe girl designs: she wears both a skirt and shorts, yet we can see everything. The directing plays up this parody of fetishistic anime designs in the shot that needlessly lingers a little too long on the butt before moving to the rest of the scene.

The animation highlight came at the end with the battle with the mammary alien, which presumably came courtesy of Takahiro Shikama. He's been working at Bones for a while now, having come to prominence for his good mecha animation in Star Driver, but he actually debuted as an inbetweener on Champloo in 2004, so perhaps it was destiny that he would work on Dandy. There wasn't much other good work that stood out. Jiro Kanai and Naoyuki Asano can be seen in the credits but I didn't spot many other good bits so I can't tell what they did.

The show hammers home that it isn't to be taken seriously. It's episodic in the extreme: they forget that the protagonists died at the end of the previous episode (though this is probably one of the puzzle pieces that will make sense in the end). Damaged spaceships are patched up with bandaids. Suddenly the show serves up a pompadour-sporting, aloha shirt-clad, double-barrel-ray-gun-shooting transforming robo. I enjoy it for not taking itself seriously while still feeling like there is some narrative mystery twist hiding behind the curtains.

I mistook Hiroshi Hamasaki for the animator Hirotsugu Kawasaki a while back because their names are so similar so I thought I'd jot down a few notes about him (mostly for my own edification).

Hirotsugu Kawasaki (川崎博嗣) is, of course, the ex-Oh Pro animator and director of Spriggan and Onigamiden. I wrote about his near-debut in the excellent Oh Pro episodes of pink jacket Lupin.

Hiroshi Hamasaki (浜崎博嗣), on the other hand, started out in 1980 at Tatsunoko and moved to Madhouse in 1987 and is best known for directing Shigurui and Texhnolyze. He was an associate of Yoshiaki Kawajiri for a while, acting as character designer/animation director of Cyber City OEDO808 and Midnight Eye Goku. He continued in the same Kawajiri-inspired contrasty gothic noir character drawing style with Bio Hunter, Dark Side Blues and the remake of Vampire Hunter D.

Hamasaki directed the Iron Man: Rise of Technovore direct-to-video movie for Madhouse last year, so apparently he still does work for them, despite the debacle with Madhouse's change of ownership that sent many of its more notable artists packing. But he also obviously does work for other studios now, having notably directed Steins;Gate a few years before this. He is one of those guys who can do it all. He'll draw animation, storyboard, direct episodes, and direct series.

On the subject of Madhouse, looking through the announced credits now I realize that many of the names are ex-Madhouse, so it seems Hiroshi Hamasaki is just the forerunner of a flood of former Madhouse artists involved in the show. I suppose potentially some of these are now working from Mappa.

Monday, February 3, 2014

03:12:00 pm , 1182 words, 3178 views     Categories: TV, Space Dandy

Space Dandy #2

I'm going to try to catch up on the episodes here to keep up with the rest of the show.

The second episode was leaps and bounds better than the first, which apart from some animation highlights fell a little flat. This episode is perfectly crafted entertainment. I can only wish every episode would be this good. I like variety, but that also opens the door to occasional lower-quality episodes. I'm guessing this show is going to be very uneven due to the big variation in staffing.

The team behind the episode is to thank for the outcome, first and foremost storyboarder/episode director Sayo Yamamoto. She's paired with writer Dai Sato. It's the return of the dream team that produced the best episodes of Samurai Champloo under Shinichiro Watanabe 10 years ago. That's where I first discovered the two, and I haven't seen anything by either of them since then that topped those episodes for me. It's like working under Shinichiro Watanabe brought out the best in them.

Sayo Yamamoto remains stellar when handling the details of a particular episode. I still like her better as an episode director than a series director, though there's no denying she's one of the few people who can bring real personality and creativity to either. She also storyboarded/directed the ending. From the macro to the micro, the episode feels good - there's variety in scenes and great rhythm overall that makes the episode flow cohesively. She injects clever touches through her storyboarding like the seeming 2001 parody where the sun rises behind the choker ball on the Statue of Liberty.

The highlight of this episode was seeing all the crazy ideas for ramen that they could cook up. Sato Dai meanwhile provides topical parody touches like the sophisticated searching tool used by Dr. Gel in locate Dandy - Street Ginga View. Also the space twitter that Meow uses to inadvertently broadcast Dandy's location to Dr. Gel - ending each tweet with 'nau' as they do on twitter these days whenever they're describing what they were just eating.

I feel like this episode also gives a better better sense of Meow's personality. It's the classic odd-couple pairing: Meow the waifu-hugging slovenly otaku yang to Dandy's disaffected hipster yankee Leisure Suit Larry yin.

The series thus far is obviously a mystery meant to keep the audience guessing. Why the jarring narrative resets and discontinuities? The ending seems to play on this suggestion of episodic parallel universes with its soup of mathematical formulae and quantum physics diagrams.

The animation was fully the equal of the directing and story, which is what made the episode such a pleasure to watch. Ex-Telecom animator and latter-day Mamoru Hosoda associate Hiroyuki Aoyama is sakkan. I don't know to what extent he was involved - i.e. just correcting drawings or correcting/drawing animation himself - but the whole episode moves a bunch in a way that has a clear Telecom vibe.

A number of ex-Telecom animators are also involved, so he must have called them in himself. The most prominent of these is Atsuko Tanaka. She's only been working on Ghibli films for the last ten years, with the exception of a few appearances in Telecom TV shows, so this is a rare treat. Certain scenes in particular exude a certain Telecom je ne sais quois. I'm wondering if she wasn't involved in the later scene with the old alien reminiscing about his past. The movement has that weightiness and fullness I associate with her. Also the way the ramen guy hunches over the counter reminds me of something I'd see in classic Lupin. It's also appropriate because one of the well-known stories about her is how Miyazaki/Takahata always cast her animating the eating scenes in Jarinko Chie, Cagliostro, etc. because she was so good at it. The old alien scarfing down the ramen definitely fits the bill. Not to mention those jello Ghibli tears.

The opening scene with the alien exam had a more modern Telecom vibe, so I was wondering if that might not be Kenji Hachizaki, but I don't know his style well enough to say for sure. I love the acting in this scene. The shot of Dandy arguing with Scarlet has some awesome exaggerated acting a la Shinji Otsuka, while the wrestling with Meow has cartoonish flavor with the repeated drawings instead of actually drawing the action out in specific detail. Hachizaki is one of the great Telecom animators, but he doesn't seem as well known as the others. He debuted on Fuma and then Akira and has been involved prolifically in all of the foreign co-productions since then, not to mention a lot of big recent movies like Hosoda's.

One of the other big guests is Tadashi Hiramatsu. He's quite pliable and I've never found his style to jump out obviously like some animators, so I'm not positive what he did here. Perhaps the scene where Dandy asks Scarlet for money immediately before being attacked by the minions? The movement as Dandy approaches Scarlet there is quite nice, with quick flourishes of Michael Jackson-inspired dance moves. The scene immediately afterwards was the most easily identifiable in the episode - Takashi Mukoda. His kung-fu is unmistakable and remarkable as always. The simplified, flat drawings also give him away. I'm guessing Gosei Oda must have done the psychedelic wobbly animation where Dandy and Meow are pulled into the ramen dimension. It seems like every episode of the show is going to have a psychedelic scene like this. One thing I didn't understand was why the shop was empty when they returned via the ramen wormhole. Was that intentional, something whose significance we can't grasp yet? The show seems littered with unexplained ellipses like this that are elided over in silence.

The nice thing about the fact that the show is being simulcast is that, for once in anime, non-Japanese speakers are able to read the full genga staff listing right at the end of each episode as it is aired. That information used to be more difficult to find, and hence limited appreciation of animators' work, since you have to know the staff to be able to break down an episode's animation. That also makes it easier for me since I don't have to translate the genga credits for each ep.

Finally, it was a treat getting another performance from Ichiro Nagai as the old alien. Ichiro Nagai is synonymous with television anime in my mind. He is the embodiment of TV anime. From the very first two classic shows - Tetsuwan Atom and Wolf Boy Ken - he has been there as a voice actor in countless TV shows, classic and obscure, over the decades. He is one of the defining voices of anime, one of the voices we all have heard countless times and recognize immediately. It's comforting to find Ichiro Nagai in an anime. He voiced so many of my favorite characters that I can't even remember them all. Last year marked 50 years of TV anime, and hence 50 years of Ichiro Nagai voice acting. I raise my cup to the man for his service to the craft.

Tuesday, January 28, 2014

12:50:00 am , 1536 words, 3944 views     Categories: TV, Space Dandy

Space Dandy #1

This is a little late, but I finally checked out Bones' new show Space Dandy. The show did not surprise or overwhelm; it delivered about what I was expecting. Thrilling in some respects, underwhelming in others. In spirit it's a throwback to an earlier time of action adventure when heroes roamed the galaxy with ray guns battling colorful aliens, but re-imagined with an attitude of ironic, affected cool that is the trademark of director Shinichiro Watanabe. With its Boobies Breastaurant, kooky aliens and jokey vibe, the show reminds of the Space Quest games, in which a bumbling protagonist went about inadvertently saving the universe.

The first episode plays it a little more safe than I would have preferred. Rather than pulling you in, the episode just tugs a bit, teasing you with a quick intro to the characters and world and its panoply of imaginatively designed aliens. It's certainly entertaining enough, but it's not quite irresistible, and not quite as clever as it thinks it is. The pacing is slow and the directing measured, and there's little in terms of plot or character introduction. That's not necessarily a bad thing; it's certainly a refreshing change compared to the exhaustingly over-the-top, in-your-face directing and convoluted conceptual schemes of other shows. The first episode ends in a peculiar way - with all of the main actors dead - as if they started telling this story from the end, which is obviously meant to spur fan theorizing, and probably has.

The fun of the show so far is in its oddball ideas: Space alien cat who likes to sneak crotch shots of waitresses with his smartphone and wears crocs. S&M Statue of Liberty headed spaceship. Arch-enemy space pimp ape. Transporter button that looks like a Wii controller.

One of the show's pulls overall is the many alien designs. Apparently hundreds of designs have been made by the various staff, including special guests like Katsushiro Otomo and Katsuya Terada. The fun of each new episode will be in seeing the crazy new aliens the protagonist has to battle against. A number of the actual design drawings feature in the opening, in their original sketchy rendering, to highlight this feature. It's nice to have a show like this where many peoples' creativity is pooled to provide a show's backbone. It reminds of the old days of Toei Doga movies, when they used to solicit designs from the whole crew, and any worthy designs would be used, no matter your rank.

Although the chief director of the show is Shinichiro Watanabe, the director of the show is Shingo Natsume, who began as an animator around 2003. I first came to notice him as a talented animator in 2006 in Welcome to the NHK. He appears to have made the transition to directing around the time he directed Tatami Galaxy ep 6, a truly fine episode featuring a bevy of interesting animators. The animator-centric approach remained for his next big job, the FMA Milos film, in which he was line director of this film that went to great pains to serve as a raw and unmediated showcase of the work of talented action animators. Kenichi Konishi was the animation director of FMA Milos, and he had previously pioneered this approach to giving a hand-drawn feeling by reproducing the animator's line in the 2006 Doraemon movie. The same approach seems to have been taken in the first episode of Space Dandy: When a good animator animates a section, it's not corrected. You're seeing every line they drew, the way they drew it. Natsume started out as an idiosyncratic animator, and he makes it a priority as a director to provide such animators working under him with the same opportunities to express themselves.

The first episode has a strange balance, restrained in its pacing for the most part before exploding into action in the last inning. While the majority of the episode is watchable, it's when the action hits the screen that the episode is most memorable. The real stars of the episode are the animators of the climactic action scene, which has real impact in part because what came before was so still, and also probably in large part because, with Natsume at the helm, they were able to really pour themselves into the work, and you're seeing their work in close to the raw state.

Bahi JD steals the show in this episode with his short but intense scene. It's a long-awaited return to the sort of Shithead Action that he started out creating in animated gifs. In just 50 seconds and 13 shots, he managed to pin my head back with some of the most exciting action I've seen in quite a while. His bit begins from the shot where the protagonist is whacked into the air by the advancing alien and continues until the water monster gets hit by bolts of electricity. If the sequence seems to move a lot, that's because it does: Bahi drew 1893 drawings for that 50-second sequence over the span of two months. Only 20 or so of all of those drawings were corrected by the sakkan Yoshiyuki Ito, so you are seeing a nearly 100% Bahi scene. On top of that, the tracer (inbetweener) reportedly did a very good job of reproducing Bahi's line, which is not always a given, so it's a great showcase of Bahi's talent.

Another thing is the density of his animation, which he achieved by using a lot of layers. Shinya Ohira was famous for using an absurd number of layers of cels in his animation in the 1980s. Some shots he animated for Gal Force, for example, used something like 15 layers and were rejected by the photographer as unshootable due to the limitations of the hardware. Beyond a certain point, the image would presumably become blurry because it was cels. In digital, you don't have that limitation, and Bahi took advantage of this in particular in the last shot, where he piled on the layers (beyond what his timesheet could handle) to create a dense cacophony of movement as the monsters battle it out.

Due to the unique way he evolved as an animator, I find that his animation moves in a way that stands out in the context, in a good way. Most Japanese animation, even the good stuff, tends to have the same rhythm deep down, but Bahi's rhythms are unique to him. His work breaks the monotony of texture of the animation. Bravo on a job well done. He went beyond the call of duty on that scene.

Yutaka Nakamura picks up right after Bahi, creating one of his best sequences to date, not that Yutaka Nakamura ever disappoints. Nakamura reportedly improvised the portion where the protagonist and cat slide down towards the enormous battling aliens, as well as the thumbs up gesture as the alien melts away, which appears to be an homage to the thumbs up at the end of T2. It's not quite clear why the characters turn dayglo as they're sliding down, but it's quite pretty. The sequence has incredible speed and momentum to it, along with lots of lovely Yutapon blocks and geometrical effects. It's also one of Yutapon's most fun scenes, with a Buster Keaton-esque part where a giant wall of rock falls on the protagonists but they're OK because there happens to be a window in the rock where it fell on them.

Other notable sequences: The section immediately after Yutaka Nakamura's, beginning from the point where the monster teleports into the spaceship, is apparently the work of a very new animator named Norifumi Kugai, who has a great instinct for full-limited style animation. Kono Megumi may have done part of the portion in the cockpit immediately before they warp out. The cat being shot at by Dandy in the restaurant was by Gosei Oda, while the section immediately preceding with the cat taking snaps was by Shintaro Doge. Both provided good work on the Milos movie under Natsume. Shintaro Doge is an exception to what I mentioned earlier, in that his work appears to have been corrected extensively, whereas Gosei Oda's appears more uncorrected, like Bahi's section. Similarly, Tomohisa Shimoyama, an animator here, was a sakkan on Milos. Milos "animation director" Kiyotaka Oshiyama was here an alien designer alongside Shintaro Doge. There's a lot of overlap with that movie.

There were quite a few alien designers credited. Episode storyboarder/director and series director Shingo Natsume is credited with "guest alien design" while
"the usual alien design" was provided by Takuhito Kusanagi, Michio Mihara, Kiyotaka Oshiyama, Shintaro Doge, Yuka Koiso and a person named Niθ. Mihara will reportedly be providing an episode later on. Natsume designed the big aliens at the end.

The show has many notable names involved besides this: Directors Atsushi Takahashi, Hiroshi Hamasaki, Goro Taniguchi and Toshio Hirata, animators Hiroyuki Aoyama, Atsuko Tanaka, Hiroshi Shimizu and Hisashi Mori, and writers Ichiro Okochi and Dai Sato, to name but a few, will be appearing in upcoming episodes. Masaaki Yuasa is reportedly doing his own episode, as is Michio Mihara. Sayo Yamamoto did the ending, and hopefully will be in for an episode at least. Much to look forward to. The show appears poised to be filled with great variety.

Tuesday, November 12, 2013

06:46:00 pm , 7553 words, 31767 views     Categories: Studio, TV, A Pro, TMS, Oh Pro

Tensai Bakabon

The early years of TV anime were occupied mostly by sci-fi and hero-style shows inspired by Tetsuwan Atom such as TCJ's Tetsujin 28-go and Toei Doga's Space Patrol Hopper. By 1965, audiences were getting bored with the formula, so a new type of show was attempted: the comedic home drama. Tokyo Movie had stumbled with their first production Big X in 1964, so in 1965 Yutaka Fujioka set out in a new direction with a new animation team and produced Obake no Q-taro, a Casper-like gag show about the misadventures of a friendly ghost who lives with an ordinary family. This was the first show featuring the recently-formed A Production animation team, who worked alongside Studio Zero, the anime/manga production studio where the Fujiko Fujio creator duo resided at the time.

In the wake of the show's explosive success, copycat gag shows mushroomed in the ensuing years. Notable gag shows of the late 1960s include Mushi Pro's Goku's Big Adventure (1967), Toei Doga's Pyun Pyun Maru (1967), Tatsunoko's Ora Guzura Da (1967) and Hoso Doga Seisaku's Fight da!! Pyuta (1968). Goku and Pyuta in particular featured fast-paced, anarchic storytelling with a healthy streak of black humor that pushed the boundaries of acceptability in the TV format (stations refused to air some episodes) and gives the shows a timeless quality that endures today in spite of the technical limitations of the animation.

Fast-forward a bit to 1971 and we come to a turning point in Tokyo Movie's history. Studio Zero finally disbanded because their staff had by that time scattered to the four winds, so Tokyo Movie had to rely more on their affiliated A Production team. But other small subcontractors had popped up over the previous few years, mostly from ex staff of Toei Doga and Mushi Pro, so Tokyo Movie had many more options now, and were not limited to producing just one show at a time. Hence in 1971, they built on the success of their popular Kyojin no Hoshi and had no less than 3 shows airing concurrently: Lupin III, Tensai Bakabon and Shin Obake no Q-taro. Shin Obake no Q-taro was a safe updating of their first hit while Lupin III was a daring experiment with more mature material. Tensai Bakabon meanwhile was an attempt at a new property with a more hardcore nonsense gag sensibility. (watch an ep)

Tokyo Movie had taken a break from gag shows after their Umeboshi Denka (1969) flopped because, again, audiences has grown tired of the new fad for gag anime that had overtaken the industry. They tried different material like Kyojin no Hoshi and Moomin for a while. Yasuo Otsuka joined A Pro in December 1968 and worked on first the Lupin III pilot and then Moomin. He was then set to work on a pilot for Tensai Bakabon, clearly indicating that Tokyo Movie had not given up on the format, and perhaps trusted Otsuka to create something that would bring it back into favor. That pilot was used as one episode in the show itself, while Otsuka himself worked on the concurrently-airing Lupin III, which was his pet project.

The pilot is an interesting beast. It is quite entertaining, but in animation style and rhythm it has a sensibility closer to Moomin than to Tensai Bakabon, with its strong layouts, languid pace, subtle humor and nuanced character animation. It's almost classy in its restraint and refinement, which is nice, but a little different from what you expect from this material. It doesn't have anything like the anarchy that Ganso would bring to the material.

The pilot begins much like the Lupin pilot, introducing the characters from the manga in black and white and then shifting into a story about how Bakabon and his dad go skiing, but wind up stealing a guy's skis and causing the guy to have a miserable time, entirely unbeknownst to both parties. The humor of the actual show went in a direction a little less subtle and more straight-up silly, but Otsuka's template showed the way to adapt this material: By moving away from the extreme simplicity of the manga drawings, bringing the characters down to earth and animating them three-dimensionally. Gyators several years later would go in the opposite direction and use the simple manga drawings as the template to create animated visuals very close to the sensibility of a gag manga.

The pilot wound up being used in the actual show as episode 16B, with a few cuts for time and with the voice acting track re-recorded (the main difference being they chose a new voice actor for Bakabon). There are no credits for the pilot, but the TV show gives Soji Yoshikawa the storyboarding credit for this episode, which is presumably what led to him directing the show. This is plausible because Otsuka obviously knew of Yoshikawa from Moomin, on which Yoshikawa storyboarded 5 episodes. Yoshikawa afterwards storyboarded the first and last episodes of Lupin III. Yoshikawa's association with Otsuka continued for a bit, as several years later he wrote many episodes of Future Boy Conan and then directed Mamo. Incidentally, Mamo was written single-handedly by Yoshikawa, even though Atsushi Yamatoya is co-credited.

Yasuo Otsuka cameo in episode 5A

After working on the early shows and then Moomin under Otsuka, A Pro's lead animators Tsutomu Shibayama, Osamu Kobayashi and Yoshio Kabashima had by that time matured to the point where they could be put at the head of their own projects, so Kabashima headed the animation of Shin Obake no Q-taro while Shibayama was made character designer and animation director of Tensai Bakabon and Otsuka headed Lupin III. Osamu Kobayashi would work as an animator on those two shows until he became animation head of the studio's next show Dokonjo Gaeru, which started the year after in 1972.

Fujio Akatsuka and Fujio Fujiko were the two creators behind some of the classic gag shows of the early period. The Fujio Fujiko duo was behind the softer, more drama-based comedy shows like Obake no Q-taro and Paa-man while Fujio Akatsuka was behind the more hard-edge straight gag shows Osomatsu-kun (Studio Zero/Children's Corner, 1966) and Moretsu Ataro (Toei Doga, 1969). Tokyo Movie had adapted Fujio Fujiko before with Obake no Q-taro, and would continue to do so extensively, but Tensai Bakabon was Tokyo Movie's first foray into a Fujio Akatsuka show.

The original manga Tensai Bakabon is essentially a home drama about a Japanese family, but told with far less of an emphasis on the everyday life aspect. Rather than telling stories about everyday life injected with humor, entire stories are built around crazy concepts. Dialogue is full of bizarre and unexplainable non-sequiturs, puns and gags that break the third wall. The whole point is to make the audience laugh with a non-stop stream of silly gags of a dark and nonsensical bent, in a tradition that harkens back to the likes of Shigeru Sugiura, albeit without the avant-garde, psychedelic aspect.

The name Tensai Bakabon or Genius Idiot Boy is mysterious nonsensical name that is difficult to rationalize, as it has an ineffable mad Zen balance that just works, but perhaps can be broken down to describe the family members: Tensai is for the boy genius infant Hajime; Baka is for the father, an idiot savant who seems to know what he's doing but in fact operates on a completely different plane of reality; and Bon is for the elder brother, a young specimen of utter mediocrity who despite his chubby frame, snub nose, and slow wits, is endearing for being an otherwise normal, happy-go-lucky, well-adjusted young boy. Year round he can be seen in a kimono with a swirl-pattern that matches the swirl on his cheeks. The other member is the mother, who is the only completely normal character in the set. She grounds the family by scolding the father and de-escalating the craziness when it seems on the verge of spiraling out of control. It's a fascinating family that works as a perfect complement of opposites. It's baffling why a normal woman would marry an idiot savant, and the boy genius Hajime speaks perfect Japanese a few days after being born - the antithesis of the pure idiocy of the father.

The father is something of a parody of a working class father, with his permanent Tora-san haramaki and hachimaki. He caps episode previews with "Watch or you get the death penalty." Recurring characters include Rerere no Ojisan, the ubiquitous guy who is always sweeping the street whenever Bakabon's dad leaves the house. At some point in every episode, he has to ask his trademark line, "Heading out?" only to receive a joke response from the father than makes him go "Rerere?" He has an anachronistic old-fashioned design that seems directly inspired by Shigeru Sugiura - he even makes the same hand gesture as Sarutobi Sasuke. Then there is the local policeman, who has a hair trigger temper and fires his gun madly at the slightest provocation. His design is a great example of Akatsuka's bizarre design sense: his eyes are drawn connected and he has a single square nostril. This was apparently deemed too much because in this first anime adaptation they separate his eyes and give him a regular nose. The second series went back to the manga design. The main characters are each distinguished by their teeth: The son has one top tooth, father as two top teeth like a hippo, and the policeman two bottom teeth.

In the manga this all plays out in a flat, empty world of white space with virtually no physical settings or sense of passing time. To translate this kind of story into animation required considerable adaptation, which Tokyo Movie did in the manner they knew best: They grounded the characters in real Japanese settings and fleshed out their lives in the manner of real Japanese people. Hence, this version feels more like a home drama in the spirit of the Fujiko Fujio anime. Even so, Tensai Bakabon experienced tribulations indicating that nonsense humor, even toned down as it was here, was still not acceptable to audiences at the time. The nature of the show actually changed at about the midway point along with the director.

Originally, the show was essentially grounded in reality, but told silly, action-centric stories packed with gags in the spirit of the manga. It wasn't a completely faithful adaptation of the original in the early episodes, but still retained a lot of its spirit. However, in the second half, that spirit is altogether gone. The gags suddenly get edged out completely in favor of a straight home drama telling harmless, mundane stories, usually about Bakabon the boy and his schoolmates. This sort of change of course happened often in these early days to gag shows, indicating a surprisingly tenacious reluctance on the part of general audiences to embrace straight gag anime - Goku no Daiboken became a dour monster show in the second half, and even as late as 1975 Gamba no Boken was changed from an unpredictable, zig-zagging light-hearted action comedy to a humorless, linear adventure due to station demands.

To give an example of the cynical, nonsensical humor of the early episodes that apparently displeased either the sponsors or the viewers, or both, before Hajime is born, father and son takes a doll out for a walk to practice carrying a baby. They drop the baby onto the street and a cab runs over it. The cab screeches to a halt, and the father screams that the baby has been run over and its brains are all over the street, sending the cab driver into shock. A nurse rushes into the emergency room announcing that a child was in a terrible accident. A huge team of surgeons gather as the doll is rushed into the operating room.

In another instance, after the baby is born, the father is out taking a walk with the newborn Hajime. Housewives gather around to comment on how cute he is, but wonder if the sun might not be too hot for a little baby. Suddenly concerned, the father hits upon a great idea to keep the baby cool: A coffin. After he parades down the street with Hajime in a coffin, weeping neighbors gather at their home in mourning clothes to offer their condolences. He deposits Hajime's coffin in front of the shocked mother, declaring, "Hajime is resting in peace in this coffin." She opens the coffin to reveal Hajime lying on a bed of flowers, resting in peace but perfectly alive. The father doesn't understand why everyone is angry, explaining that it's nice and cool in the coffin.

The second half of the show appears the same on the surface, but is completely absent dark humor of this kind. The father's mad behavior doesn't exist for its own sake, but rather is explained and rationalized away as the well-meaning antics of an eccentric but otherwise good-hearted father. Before he existed in a sort of existential void, like an enlightened ascetic, exempt from fatherly duties and social norms alike, but now all of a sudden he has a 9-to-5 job as a gardener, which grounds him as an ordinary human rather than an expressive symbol who exists merely to upturn social conventions and common sense.

The first half is quite enjoyable in its balance of nonsense humor and everyday drama. It's neither too over-the-top nor too restrained. The stories of the second half, however, neuter the show and render it bland and unremarkable, though not unwatchable by any stretch. A few years later Tokyo Movie would remake the show into Ganso Tensai Bakabon in a way that was much more true to the spirit of the original manga. Ganso is an uninterrupted blast of comedic nonsense and outrageously exaggerated animation to match, in sharp contrast to the tasteful and restrained atmosphere of the first version. But both versions have their virtues.

The animation

Tensai Bakabon is the show where you can see the A Pro style on the cusp of maturity, which was reached in the next show, Dokonjo Gaeru. In comparison, the animation of Tensai Bakabon is generally restrained and somewhat hesitating, if always pleasing to watch thanks to the good layout sensibility of Shibayama. By the time of the second Tensai Bakabon show a few years later, the drawings are much more refined and assured. Despite the two shows being separated only by a few years, the animators developed incredibly over those years and the difference in quality is stark. Tsutomu Shibayama's designs in Tensai Bakabon are nice and stylized but somewhat basic and lacking the refinement they would acquire in Ganso Tensai Bakabon.

That said, there is still much to appreciate in the first show. At a basic level, the show itself is still very entertaining even after all these years. Doraemon is the modern equivalent of a show like this, but unlike a show like Doraemon, Tensai Bakabon actually has a cynical, satirical edge lacking in the completely kiddified Doraemon. It's truly a crossover show that appeals to both kids and adults. The humor is witty and clever without being inane and pandering.

The animation drawings are quite basic compared to today's highly detailed anime, as the show comes at something of a crossroads between the early drawings of the 60s and the more mature style of the mid-70s when the TV-bred animator generation was beginning to mature. The good aspect of this is that the simplicity of the drawings allows the animators to focus on moving the characters around freely, and there is a lot of freedom to play around and deform the characters in novel ways. The characters here have a very caricatural style that makes them fun to look at. That is something Shibayama brought to the table, as his characters are much more tightly stylized than the manga.

For example, comparing the last episode of Toei Doga's Moretsu Ataro reveals what A Pro brought to the table. (watch) This episode was aired Christmas day 1970, 9 months before the start of Tensai Bakabon (and incidentally was directed by Isao Takahata, in his very last job at Toei Doga). The narrative style is more unadorned and close to the manga, seeming to consist of a series of gag panels rather than a story that has narrative buildup and tension. The character drawings are quite different from A Pro's drawings. There is far less creative deformation, and the animation is spare and perfunctory. There is none of the creative timing, artistic license with design, and complicated movements of A Pro's work.

A Pro's animators were great at drawing characters in a loose way that is neither too sloppy and casual like Moretsu Ataro, nor over-stylized. The characters are stylized in a way appropriate to animation, and the layouts are stronger, situating the characters in a more realistic three-dimensional space. Moretsu Ataro feels closer in style to the flat world of the manga, and it is appealing for that reason, but there is something bland about watching that in animation, without something to spice it up. The manga didn't have the sort of narrative tension or pacing you expect of animation. A monotone sequence of gags gets old after a while. Tensai Bakabon seems to successfully translate the world of Fujio Akatsuka into animation in a way that retains your attention by creating engaging stories and fleshing the personalities (and animation) of the characters out. It's something akin to how Isao Takahata brought alive the rudimentary manga drawings of Hisaichi Ichii in My Neighbors the Yamadas.

Aside from stronger layouts and richer and more three-dimensional and vivid animation, Tensai Bakabon also seems to feature more playful and wilful animation that allows animator personality to come through. Thus you can actually identify the different animators at work in the various episodes through their distinguishing features. The pink jacket Lupin III was one of the few shows in the 80s that retained this spirit, with its wild variation in drawing style from one episode to the next due to the different styles of the animators who worked on the show, and the reason is obvious. It's because Yuzo Aoki was a holdover of the 1970s A Pro generation, and he carried on that spirit by laying down a basic template conducive to creativity, and allowing animators to do their thing. The most prominent latter-day animator to carry on this spirit is Hiroyuki Imaishi, and looking back at these old A Pro shows you can see quite clearly where Imaishi got a lot of his inspiration. Kanada is bandied about as his main influence, but to my eyes he is about 50% Kanada and 50% A Pro. Tensai Bakabon is, then, not just a fun show that is still a blast to watch after more than 40 years; it's also one of the earliest incarnations of this school of animation that went on to influence so many later animators.

The subcontractors behind the animation

Self references: Jaggard on the menu (Jaggard) / Newscaster Shioyama (Oh Pro)

On the staff side of things, Tensai Bakabon features many of the subcontractors I talked about in my post on Koya no Shonen Isamu (1973), with a few differences.

A Pro:Osamu KobayashiTanaka TsutomuRyo Yasuoka
Oh Pro:Norio ShioyamaKoshin Yonekawa
Neo Media:Yoshiyuki MomoseMasayuki Uchiyama
Mates:Teruo HandaMasafumi Kubota
Jaggard:Saito HiroshiMasakazu Ikeda(then Masami Abe, Shunichi Sakai, Michiyo Sakurai)
Za In:Seiji OkudaKazuo Iimura

Again, none of the subcontracting studios that worked on the show are credited, but with a little research, I was able to figure out which studios were involved. Each of the show's 40 episodes is broken down into two stories. Each half-episode story is animated by (usually) two animators from a single studio.

Other studios involved in a smaller fashion are Ad 5, Office Uni and Junio. I'm not 100% positive about Ad 5 and Office Uni, as they were transient studios about which it is difficult to find much information.

With the exception of Jaggard (which disbanded in 1972) and the addition of Madhouse (which formed in 1972), this is the same grouping that would go on to work on Dokonjo Gaeru starting the next year, in the same format of two animators from one studio handling half an episode. While Tensai Bakabon was airing, the same subcontractors concurrently had their other animators working on Lupin III and Panda Kopanda: Oh Pro Koichi Murata and Joji Manabe; Neo Media Keiichiro Kimura and Yasuhiro Yamaguchi; Mates Kenzo Koizumi and Takashi Asakura; A Pro Yoshifumi Kondo, Yuzo Aoki and Hideo Kawauchi; and Junio Tetsuo Imazawa. By the time of Ganso Tensai Bakabon a few years later the team was fairly different.

The most interesting thing about Tensai Bakabon is perhaps that there are is a lot of unexpected staff continuity with the earlier classic gag shows I mentioned before: Goku no Daiboken and Fight da!! Pyuta. This is surprising because these shows were produced by different studios that came together under completely different circumstances. It's as if they were naturally drawn together on Tensai Bakabon to work on this material due to their natural proclivities, though for the most part it probably had more to do with the closure of certain studios and the opening of others, and where the work was to be had.

The biggest of these is (first half) series director, Soji Yoshikawa. He was an animator in both Goku and Pyuta. This made him an obvious choice to direct this material. This multi-talented individual is of course best remembered as the director of Lupin III: Mystery of Mamo.(1978), but he was also a prolific script writer who wrote most of Votoms. Yoshikawa had started out at Mushi Pro in the early days, and was part of the group of brash young hotshot animators pulled out by Gisaburo Sugii to run Art Fresh, the studio that animated Goku no Daiboken and then disbanded. Others in this group included Seiji Okuda, who is one of the main animators of Tensai Bakabon. Okuda was also an animator in Pyuta.

Episode 2A director Tameo Kohanawa had meanwhile directed several episodes of Pyuta in addition to being the character designer. Takeuchi Daizo, who worked as an animator in two episodes of Tensai Bakabon, directed several episodes of Pyuta. Both of them started out at Toei Doga in 1963-1964 and left in 1967 to join Pyuta production company Hoso Doga Seisaku. Hoso Doga Seisaku was short-lived studio staffed by a motley assortment of misfits who didn't want to make your typical anime. Sound familiar? There is a spiritual undercurrent connecting Goku and Pyuta despite their surface dissimilarity. Pyuta was the only show they produced entirely on their own, and they disbanded immediately afterwards. One of the studios formed in the aftermath was Office Uni, and I speculate that it's from here that Takeuchi Daizo (and Shingo Matsuo) worked on Tensai Bakabon, but I'm not positive about this.

Takeuchi Daizo in episode 12A

Takeuchi Daizo animated episode 12A of Tensai Bakabon, about a magician picked on by Bakabon's father. It features lots of exaggerated and deformed drawings of the magician and shows off Takeuchi Daizo's unique animation sensibility. His animation is not backed up by solid drawing skills, but rather by the self-assurance that he can come up with lots of fun and clever poses and actions. This is a somewhat different approach to the A Pro school, which is more solid and grounded in fundamentals. You can see more animation in the loose and free style of Takeuchi Daizo in Pyuta.

Both Tameo Kohanawa and Takeuchi Daizo went on to work extensively on Manga Nihon Mukashibanashi and Manga Sekai Mukashibanashi. This episode about an ignorant lion is a particularly nicely animated episode by Takeuchi Daizo, who had a very loose and deformed animation style that is very fun to watch. He seems to draw everything using ink brush lines rather than pencil. Daizo eventually went on to focus on more indie work, whereas Tameo Kohanawa remains active as a director in the industry. These two are exemplary of the unique style of the figures who worked on Pyuta, many of whom had a more indie attitude towards animation that led to them going down different avenues in comparison with the typical Toei Doga/Mushi Pro expat.

Jaggard is a studio that nobody seems to talk about anymore, but they were one of the many studios that mushroomed in the 1960s to meet the growing demand for animators created by the burgeoning TV anime industry. Founded in 1966 by Hiroshi Saito together with Shingo Araki, the studio would only continue until 1972, when both animators went their separate ways. Hiroshi Saito was born in 1936, only one year after Takahata, so he is part of the generation that experienced the appearance of TV anime on the front lines. He started out at Otogi Pro in 1960 and then switched to Mushi Pro in 1963, and left in 1966 to found his own studio. From there, he subcontracted for Tokyo Movie's Kyojin no Hoshi, where Shingo Araki did some of his first work as an animator and Hiroshi Saito debuted as a director. Mushi Pro's Ashita no Joe is one of the lats places that you can see all of the Jaggard animators working together, and Tensai Bakabon was the very last job of Jaggard before Hiroshi Saito moved to Zuiyo. He wound up staying at the studio even after it switched to Nippon Animation, and was one of the studio's main directors for the next two decades.

It's in Hiroshi Saito's hands that Tensai Bakabon switched course to a more family-friendly bent, and he would continue to direct more wholesome, light-hearted, breezy material in that spirit for the rest of his career at Nippon Animation. Perhaps in line with this, the Jaggard episodes of Tensai Bakabon are among the least distinctive. It's difficult to find distinguishing characteristics or quirks in the animation. It's as if they are striving to remain as on-model and ruly as possible. So I will leave them out of this next section.

The different styles of each subcontractor

It can be difficult at times to distinguish the styles of the studios in this show, as for the most part the drawings are not very idiosyncratic. Another factor is Shibayama's corrections. His corrections could be present a lot of the time, which makes identifying animator's styles difficult. Then there is the fact that the drawing style of the characters seems to evolve over the course of the show.

Despite that, there are many moments throughout the show where a more individual style peeks through. Sometimes it's a particular way of drawing a character in certain poses, or a certain touch of line, while other times it isn't the drawings at all but rather the movement itself which is identifiable. For example, Osamu Kobayashi's characters have an easily identified round and bulbous style that moves sparely, while Yoshiyuki Momose's animation has a more restrained look but uses a lot of drawings to create rapid, fluid motions that are easily identifiable in terms of the movement. Also, my impression is that the personality of a given episode's animators seems come through more in the guest characters, because Shibayama's corrections tend to be focused on the main characters.

A Pro

Recommended A Pro episode: 32A (Bakabon goes on a trip by himself)

I might as well start with the work of A Pro, since they were the main subcontractor behind the animation. But surprisingly, apart from Shibayama's corrections, which keep the main characters in line throughout the show, A Pro's style doesn't dominate the show. There are only a scattered few episodes actually animated by A Pro, and the other episodes have a very different style. It is said that although the A Pro shows were sakkan'd by Shibayama and Kobayashi, they actually didn't do much sakkaning, and Yoshifumi Kondo did corrections for the in-house episodes. Kobayashi and Shibayama were mostly occupied with designing the characters, and in their own episodes they laid the template for how the characters should move.

Osamu Kobayashi is the most identifiable animator in the A Pro episodes. All of the images above are his. If you only saw the shots above, you might think you were looking at Dokonjo Gaeru. Even within the A Pro episodes, it's pretty obvious that Osamu Kobayashi's scenes were not even corrected by Shibayama, because the two have a completely different style. You can see the round & bulbous style I mentioned above quite clearly in the images above. Kobayashi doesn't draw wild deformations or funny faces of the kind you'll find in the other studios' episodes. He keeps the characters pretty firm. The mother is super cute, and even Bakabon's dad looks cute in Kobayashi's hands.

Kobayashi keeps the movement very restrained and still most of the time, efficiently bursting into quickly timed full motion only occasionally to keep the drawing count down, which works to very good effect. It never feels like it isn't moving very much, even though he reportedly used a dramatically smaller number of drawings than someone like Momose. In Dokonjo Momose relates that he would be using 3000 drawings per half episode where Kobayashi would only be using a bit over 1000, and yet Kobayashi's animation never felt like it was restrained. It's clear that working with Yasuo Otsuka during the preceding year or so rubbed off on him and he learned how to effectively switch between stillness and motion at the right moment to make it feel natural.

Another key thing that sets the Kobayashi shots above and A Pro's work in general apart is the stronger layouts. The characters are properly anchored to a setting, rather than simply being drawn flat in the middle of the screen without much thought to their relation to the background. If you do a cursory comparison of the basic positioning of the characters by the other animators pictured below you'll notice the difference. Kobayashi's characters seem to actually inhabit a space. They're drawn recessed a little, with proper if rudimentary perspective, whereas the other animators tend to just draw the characters smack in the middle of the screen, full bore, filling up the image. It's not necessarily realism per se, but it gives the characters more of a feeling of reality. Combined with the masterfully balanced drawings, this goes a long way to accounting for what made A Pro such a special studio that stood out from the pack in the 1970s. Kobayashi's work only truly comes alive starting the next year in Dokonjo Gaeru, but this gives a good feeling for how Kobayashi evolved into his mature style between the time he worked on Moomin under Otsuka and the time he worked on Dokonjo Gaeru.

Incidentally, the credits of this show often seem to reverse the A and B parts. For example, the pilot was included as episode 16B in the TV show. But the Oh Pro animators are credited for part A in episode 16, when they should be credited for part B. This happens countless times and makes the credits somewhat unreliable. Sometimes the order is right, sometimes it isn't. You have to have a sense of the animators' styles to be able to tell. Other episodes that seems switched include episodes 12, 16, 19 and 23. The pilot doesn't include any credits, so the TV episode is the only place we have to turn for credits. I know Otsuka worked on the pilot, but he isn't even credited. And the credits that are there are the same as every other A Pro episode, which is suspicious.

Oh Pro

Recommended Oh Pro episode: 39B (Bakabon's father joins a circus)

One of the other great subcontractors of the 1970s is Oh Pro, founded in 1970 by Koshin Yonekawa, Koichi Murata, Kazuo Komatsubara and Norio Shioyama. I've written about Oh Pro numerous times in the past (Oh Pro's Devilman, Little Twins, Koichi Murata, Lupin III series 2, Lupin III series 3, Kazuo Komatsubara) as along with A Pro they are perhaps my favorite animation studio ever. During the first few years of their existence, they split their small force in half to work concurrently on Toei and Tokyo Movie shows.

Thus in the first year Kazuo Komatsubara headed work on Toei's Tiger Mask while Koichi Murata headed work on Tokyo Movie's Attack No. 1. In the next year, 1971, Komatsubara worked on Toei's Genshi Shonen Ryu (watch ep 1) while Koshin Yonekawa and Norio Shioyama worked on Tokyo Movie's Tensai Bakabon and Koichi Murata worked on Tokyo Movie's Lupin III. After a few years Oh Pro's A Pro team switched to working on Zuiyo/Nippon Animation productions.

I already wrote about Koichi Murata's wonderful work on Koya no Shonen Isamu in 1973. Here in Tensai Bakabon in 1971 you can revel in the almost equally wonderful work of Koshin Yonekawa. Norio Shioyama worked alongside Yonekawa, but I believe the characterful drawings in the Oh Pro episodes, of which a sampling is pictured above, are of the hand of Yonekawa. Shioyama wound up leaving Oh Pro immediately after Bakabon to work at Tatsunoko, whereas Yonekawa would go on to be Oh Pro's main rotation animator (alongside Joji Manabe) on Dokonjo Gaeru starting the next year in 1972.

Yonekawa's drawings are very cartoonish in a classical western sense, with wild deformation and fun character drawings. He doesn't use many drawings or create vivid movement per se, but rather uses a small number of drawings effectively to create raucous and lively character animation. His characters twist and turn, stretch and squash, and squeezes out a new playfully exaggerated expression at every moment. His animation is tremendously fun to watch. There's a new kind of looseness and freedom to the drawings, while on the other hand the movement is lacking in the vivid movement of the A Pro school. Even when they're extremely deformed, the character drawings retain a certain tasteful stylization, whereas in the hands of other animators the deformation can sometimes be ugly and lacking in refinement.

Mates

Recommended Mates episode: 1B (Bakabon practices with a doll in preparation for the birth of his little brother)

This is one of the studios I'm not so sure about. I know very little about Studio Mates to begin with other than that it was presumably founded by Kenzo Koizumi, who later worked as one of the rotation animators on Koya no Shonen Isamu. I believe that the episodes featuring Teruo Handa and Masafumi Kubota are Mates episodes, though I am not positive. The previous year these two animators worked extensively on Tiger Mask, so perhaps Mates had also split their forces between Toei and Tokyo Movie shows in the early years.

The Mates episodes stand out in their own way from the other episodes. I actually like the work here, unlike the Mates episodes in Isamu. The drawings are not necessarily good per se, but they are characterful and have energy. Occasionally there will be extreme deformation of characters that is quite fun to watch, if not particularly clean, well stylized or pleasingly drawn. The mouth tends to be drawn in a distinctive way as this wide, craggy, uneven opening. The movement is not particularly well timed, but there are some vivid movements that use a lot of drawings. It's not nearly as static as the A Pro episodes. The Mates episodes have a kind of rough energy to them.

Episode 7A begins with a gangster movie playing in a theater. It's drawn in the hyper-expressive realist style of Tiger Mask, with rough lines and hardcore mean looking manly faces. This was probably a joke inserted by these animators who had just come from working on such material the previous year.

In episode 1B, Bakabon wants to practice on a baby, but has a difficult time finding a good substitute. This is one of the best of the early episodes for its dark sense of humor and extreme drawings. First Bakabon says he wants to practice on a cat, but the cat is too hairy, so Bakabon's father pulls out a razor and offers to fix the problem. Then they go out looking for an idea in the streets when they encounter a mother scolding her child. She says "I'm going to throw you away if you don't stop crying" and Bakabon's father promptly says "I'll take him if you don't want him". The Tiger Mask influence comes through here when the mother busts out some pro wrestling moves and annihilates both Bakabon's father and the policeman who came to arrest her for assault. Afterwards, they make a doll and walk around with it, eventually dropping it on the street in the gag I mentioned earlier.

Neo Media

Recommended Neo Media episode: 18A (Bakabon's teacher comes over and gets drunk)

The Neo Media episodes contain work from a young 18-year-old named Yoshiyuki Momose, who had just joined the studio the same year in 1971. This is essentially his debut as a key animator. Since he was such a green animator, the work doesn't have the strong character of the other animators in the show, most of whom already had years of experience in the industry. And yet it stands out for its fundamental strength of movement. Rather than standing out for the drawings, it stands out for the quality of the animation. The characters actually come alive in his hands.

It's this ability to bring characters alive in movement that set Neo Media founder Keiichiro Kimura apart in the late 1960s. Stylistically, Momose is not influenced by Kimura at all. Momose has none of the strange timing and rough drawing that characterize Kimura. Though working from Neo Media, he developed entirely under the influence of Tsutomu Shibayama and Osamu Kobayashi. It was their work that stimulated his imagination and taught him the basics of animation. One of the most important things he learned from them was the importance of layouts. Most of the industry presumably did not have great layout skills, but the A Pro animators always positioned their characters very carefully on the screen, and that is one of the things that set their work apart. You can see clearly that the characters run around their environment in a more dynamic and calculated way in his work compared with anyone else on the show. A little bit later on, it was A Pro animator Yoshifumi Kondo who inspired a spirit of friendly rivalry prompting him to strive to pack as much interesting movement as he could into his shots.

It's quite remarkable that in his debut he is able to create animation that already has so much life. He is just one of those animators who has it in his blood, who has the instinct for it, and he was good right off the bat. Long shots feature characters engaging in minute actions that play out over the entire screen. In one of the best episodes of the show, 18A, Bakabon's teacher comes over to talk about Bakabon with his father, but winds up being tempted by some sake and gets completely wasted. He runs around the house banging his head against the things and running up the walls in one of the show's most lively and entertaining sequences, brought alive vividly by Momose's animation. Momose would definitely be even better by the time of Dokonjo Gaeru the next year, but his work here is still quite entertaining.

Za In

Recommended Za In episodes: 19A (Bakabon's father destroys an airline company), 26B (Bakabon's father enters a singing competition)

The Za In episodes are among the most interesting in the show. They have some of the most fun and entertaining character drawings of all, along with zippy movement. I believe the main animator responsible for the best parts of these episodes would be Seiji Okuda. He started out in animation prior to the TV era, and when Mushi Pro released Testuwan Atom he joined the industry on Tetsujin 28. He worked as an animator for a few years before added storyboarding to his repertoire around 1971. Since then, he went on to focus on storyboarding, and is now reportedly the single most prolific storyboarder in history in Japan, even surpassing the legendarily prolific Yoshiyuki Tomino (who storyboarded episodes of Tensai Bakabon under the pen name Asa Minami). He has worked on no less than 200 individual productions throughout his career. He also directed a few shows like Dancougar and Dream Hunter Rem, though storyboarding is his main thing.

When I saw Okuda's episodes, I felt a sense of deja vu. It took me a while to figure out why that was. I've been a big fan of Goku no Daiboken for many years, and it turns out Okuda was an animator in Goku, and his drawings in Bakabon unconsciously reminded me of his work in Goku, even though I didn't even know he was involved in the show. I don't have my Goku DVD box with me to check the credits right now, so I'm not positive which episodes he did, but I know he was one of the animators brought by Gisaburo Sugii to animate the show at Art Fresh. He also worked as an animator on Pyuta the year after Goku, so I've included shots of what I suspect are his work from these two shows above to give a sense of his style and how it connects with his later work on Tensai Bakabon.

Okuda also worked on Moomin and went on to work as one of the main rotation animators of Dokonjo Gaeru, so he was an animator in many of the best gag shows of the first decade of TV anime.

Okuda doesn't receive almost any recognition for it anymore since he went on to become mainly a storyboarder, but he was one of the best animators active in the early TV era across a number of the era's best shows. His style is immediately identifiable and stands head and shoulders above most of his peers. Pyuta is especially instructive in the quality of his work as most of the show has fairly crummy animation. The half-episode he animated (episode 5A) is full of his distinctively drawn characters, which look nothing whatsoever like the rest of the show. His earlier work on Goku was a little more static, consisting mostly of single drawings with a few extra drawings for movement, but by the time of Tensai Bakabon there is a lot more movement and zip, and yet there is still that great instinctive sense for how to draw funny expressions and poses.

I'm not positive that Seiji Okuda was at Za In (ザ・イン) during Bakabon, but the animator who helped Okuda on his episodes, Kazuo Iimura, along with the inbetweeners who worked on his episodes, Mitsuo Kusakabe & Masayoshi Okazaki, later became part of the actual studio called Sign (ザイン) founded in 1984. They even have their own web site.

I've done something novel this time and broken down the key animation credits by studio to the best of my knowledge.


Tensai Bakabon 天才バカボン
(Tokyo Movie, Yomiuri TV, 40 eps, 9/1971 - 6/1972)

Director:吉川惣司Soji Yoshikawa (1-22)
斉藤博、岡部英二Hiroshi Saito & Eiji Okabe (23-40)
Anim Director:柴山努Tsutomu Shibayama
Art Director:影山仁Hitoshi Kageyama
Music:渡辺岳夫Takeo Watanabe
Asst Directors:向坪利次、田中実Toshitsugu Mukaitsubo & Minoru Tanaka
Asst Anim Dir:竹内留吉Tomekichi Takeuchi
Storyboards:高倉健一Kenichi Takakura (1a, 1b)
小華和ためおTameo Kohanawa (2a)
奥田誠治Seiji Okuda (2b)
岡崎稔Minoru Okazaki (3a, 6b, 7a, 12a, 23b, 27b)
佐々木正広Masahiro Sasaki (3b, 6a, 8b, 11a, 15b, 23a, 25b, 27a, 29a, 31b)
小泉謙三Kenzo Koizumi (4a)
風間幸雄Yukio Kazama (4b, 5b, 7b, 10a, 13a)
出崎哲Tetsuo Dezaki (5a, 10b, 12b)
羽根章悦Yoshiyuki Hane (8a)
新田義方Yoshikata Arata (9a)
北川一夫Kazuo Kitagawa (9b)
高円寺太郎Taro Koenji (11b, 32b, 37b, 39b)
壺中天Ten Tsubonaka (13b, 15a, 17a, 31a, 34b, 35b, 36a)
平田敏夫Toshio Hirata (14a)
山崎修二Shuji Yamazaki (14b, 19a, 22b, 30a, 33b, 34a, 36b, 37a, 39a, 40)
斉藤博Hiroshi Saito (16a, 21b, 28a, 30b, 32a, 35a, 38a, 38b)
吉川惣持Soji Yoshikawa (16b)
南阿佐/阿佐みなみAsa Minami/Minami Asa (17b, 19b/22a, 24a, 26b)
石黒昇Noboru Ishiguro (18a, 20a, 25a, 29b)
遠藤政治Seiji Endo (18b, 20b)
高橋春男Haruo Takahashi (21a, 24b, 28b, 33a)
ひこねのりおNorio Hikone (26a)

Key Animators:

OH PROMATES
1塩山紀生
Norio Shioyama
米川功真
Koshin Yonekawa
半田輝雄
Teruo Handa
窪田正史
Masafumi Kubota
JAGGARDNEO MEDIA
2斉藤 博
Hiroshi Saito
池田正和
Masakazu Ikeda
百瀬義幸
Yoshiyuki Momose
内山正幸
Masayuki Uchiyama
ZA INOH PRO
3奥田誠治
Seiji Okuda
飯村一夫
Kazuo Iimura
塩山紀生
Norio Shioyama
米川功真
Koshin Yonekawa
MATESAD 5?
4半田輝雄
Teruo Handa
窪田正史
Masafumi Kubota
羽根章悦
Yoshiyuki Hane
岡田敏靖
Toshiyasu Okada
OH PROJAGGARD
5塩山紀生
Norio Shioyama
米川功真
Koshin Yonekawa
斉藤 博
Hiroshi Saito
池田正和
Masakazu Ikeda
NEO MEDIAJUNIO?
6百瀬義行
Yoshiyuki Momose
内山正幸
Masayuki Uchiyama
須田 勝
Masaru Suda
渡辺邦夫
Kunio Watanabe
MATESJAGGARD
7半田輝雄
Teruo Handa
窪田正史
Masafumi Kubota
安部正己
Masami Abe
桜井美智代
Michiyo Sakurai
ZA INNEO MEDIAOH PRO
8奥田誠治
Seiji Okuda
飯村一夫
Kazuo Iimura
百瀬義行
Yoshiyuki Momose
塩山紀生
Norio Shioyama
米川功真
Koshin Yonekawa
A PROMATESJAGGARD
9田中 勉
Tsutomu Tanaka
半田輝雄
Teruo Handa
安部正己
Masami Abe
桜井美智代
Michiyo Sakurai
ZA INJAGGARD
10奥田誠治
Seiji Okuda
飯村一夫
Kazuo Iimura
安部正己
Masami Abe
桜井美智代
Michiyo Sakurai
NEO MEDIAOH PRO
11百瀬義行
Yoshiyuki Momose
内山正幸
Masayuki Uchiyama
塩山紀生
Norio Shioyama
米川功真
Koshin Yonekawa
ZA INOFFICE UNI?
12奥田誠治
Seiji Okuda
飯村一夫
Kazuo Iimura
竹内大三
Daizo Takeuchi
松尾信吾
Shingo Matsuo
MATESJAGGARD
13半田輝雄
Teruo Handa
窪田正史
Masafumi Kubota
安部正己
Masami Abe
桜井美智代
Michiyo Sakurai
NEO MEDIAOH PRO
14百瀬義行
Yoshiyuki Momose
内山正幸
Masayuki Uchiyama
塩山紀生
Norio Shioyama
米川功真
Koshin Yonekawa
A PROMATES
15小林おさむ
Osamu Kobayashi
田中 勉
Tsutomu Tanaka
安岡 亨
Ryo Yasuoka
半田輝夫
Teruo Handa
窪田正史
Masafumi Kubota
A PROOFFICE UNI?
16小林おさむ
Osamu Kobayashi
田中 勉
Tsutomu Tanaka
安岡 亨
Ryo Yasuoka
竹内大三
Daizo Takeuchi
松尾信吾
Shingo Matsuo
JUNIO?OH PRO
17端名貴男
Takao Hashina
須田 勝
Masaru Suda
塩山紀生
Norio Shioyama
米川功真
Koshin Yonekawa
NEO MEDIAJAGGARD
18百瀬義行
Yoshiyuki Momose
内山正幸
Masayuki Uchiyama
坂井俊一
Shunichi Sakai
桜井美智代
Michiyo Sakurai
MATESZA IN
19半田輝雄
Teruo Handa
窪田正史
Masafumi Kubota
奥田誠治
Seiji Okuda
飯村一夫
Kazuo Iimura
ZA INOH PRO
20奥田誠治
Seiji Okuda
飯村一夫
Kazuo Iimura
塩山紀生
Norio Shioyama
米川功真
Koshin Yonekawa
MATESJAGGARD
21半田輝雄
Teruo Handa
窪田正史
Masafumi Kubota
坂井俊一
Shunichi Sakai
桜井美智代
Michiyo Sakurai
NEO MEDIAOH PRO
22百瀬義行
Yoshiyuki Momose
内山正幸
Masayuki Uchiyama
塩山紀生
Norio Shioyama
米川功真
Koshin Yonekawa
NEO MEDIAZA IN
23百瀬義行
Yoshiyuki Momose
内山正幸
Masayuki Uchiyama
奥田誠治
Seiji Okuda
飯村一夫
Kazuo Iimura
A PROMATES
24小林おさむ
Osamu Kobayashi
田中 勉
Tsutomu Tanaka
安岡 亨
Ryo Yasuoka
半田輝夫
Teruo Handa
窪田正史
Masafumi Kubota
JAGGARDOH PRO
25坂井俊一
Shunichi Sakai
桜井美智代
Michiyo Sakurai
塩山紀生
Norio Shioyama
米川功真
Koshin Yonekawa
NEO MEDIAZA IN
26百瀬義行
Yoshiyuki Momose
内山正幸
Masayuki Uchiyama
奥田誠治
Seiji Okuda
飯村一夫
Kazuo Iimura
JAGGARDOH PRO
27坂井俊一
Shunichi Sakai
桜井美智代
Michiyo Sakurai
塩山紀生
Norio Shioyama
米川功真
Koshin Yonekawa
A PROMATES
28小林おさむ
Osamu Kobayashi
田中 勉
Tsutomu Tanaka
安岡 亨
Ryo Yasuoka
半田輝雄
Teruo Handa
窪田正史
Masafumi Kubota
NEO MEDIAZA IN
29百瀬義行
Yoshiyuki Momose
内山正幸
Masayuki Uchiyama
奥田誠治
Seiji Okuda
飯村一夫
Kazuo Iimura
JAGGARDOH PRO
30坂井俊一
Shunichi Sakai
桜井美智代
Michiyo Sakurai
塩山紀生
Norio Shioyama
米川功真
Koshin Yonekawa
JAGGARDMATES
31坂井俊一
Shunichi Sakai
桜井美智代
Michiyo Sakurai
半田輝雄
Teruo Handa
窪田正史
Masafumi Kubota
A PROOH PRO
32小林おさむ
Osamu Kobayashi
田中 勉
Tsutomu Tanaka
安岡 亨
Ryo Yasuoka
塩山紀生
Norio Shioyama
米川功真
Koshin Yonekawa
NEO MEDIAZA IN
33百瀬義行
Yoshiyuki Momose
内山正幸
Masayuki Uchiyama
奥田誠治
Seiji Okuda
飯村一夫
Kazuo Iimura
JAGGARDMATES
34坂井俊一
Shunichi Sakai
桜井美智代
Michiyo Sakurai
半田輝雄
Teruo Handa
窪田正史
Masafumi Kubota
MATESZA IN
35半田輝雄
Teruo Handa
窪田正史
Masafumi Kubota
奥田誠治
Seiji Okuda
飯村一夫
Kazuo Iimura
MATESJAGGARD
36半田輝雄
Teruo Handa
窪田正史
Masafumi Kubota
坂井俊一
Shunichi Sakai
桜井美智代
Michiyo Sakurai
NEO MEDIAOH PRO
37百瀬義行
Yoshiyuki Momose
内山正幸
Masayuki Uchiyama
塩山紀生
Norio Shioyama
米川功真
Koshin Yonekawa
JAGGARDZA IN
38坂井俊一
Shunichi Sakai
桜井美智代
Michiyo Sakurai
奥田誠治
Seiji Okuda
飯村一夫
Kazuo Iimura
MATESOH PRO
39半田輝雄
Teruo Handa
窪田正史
Masafumi Kubota
塩山紀生
Norio Shioyama
米川功真
Koshin Yonekawa
NEO MEDIAZA IN
40百瀬義行
Yoshiyuki Momose
内山正幸
Masayuki Uchiyama
奥田誠治
Seiji Okuda
飯村一夫
Kazuo Iimura

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