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« The seconding system at Toei DogaLupin III Part 2 episode 30 »

Sunday, October 23, 2011

11:27:00 pm , 4697 words, 88083 views     Categories: Animation

The anime production line

I was asked to talk about the hierarchy of anime production, so here is a very basic explanation of some of the key steps in anime production. As a way of outlining the basic workflow, I'll give a brief rundown of what each of the terms that you find in anime credits entails. The terms are ordered in basic production order, from pre-production tasks to animation tasks to final assembly.

I'll limit this discussion to the terms that pertain to the animation without touching on the other aspects like writing, production, art, etc., because otherwise it would take way too long to write, and I know less about those. Please take this as what it is: the gleanings of an enthusiast. I've never worked in anime; this is just what I've been able to piece together from reading and watching anime for a long time, so please forgive any inaccuracies or vagaries.

I'm sure more detailed versions of this information are available, but I thought I'd write my own brief version for any readers of this blog who might feel they don't know enough about what each production task entails. I don't know as much as I wish I did about all this, but I've written what I know.

Read Peter Chung's posts in this thread on my forum to learn more details about this from someone who has actual experience on the Japanese production floor.

設定 Settei = Groundwork or Designs

The pre-production stage involves drawing lots of drawings to get a sense of where to go with the production, from drawings of the world to character sketches. Settei is a catchall term for pre-production work, although it can also be used to mean 'design', as in character design. The character design sheets are a type of settei. Bijutsu settei 美術設定 are another type of settei - they're line drawings serving as the basis for background art. Often nowadays the English word design is used in place of settei. You see numerous other types of design credits of many TV shows nowadays: Bijustu design, prop design, etc.

イメージボード Imeeji Boodo = Image Board

Image boards are another type of pre-production drawing, but unlike settei, image boards are basically concept art not intended for actual use in the production. They are drawings made to flesh out production, to come up with ideas, to establish the direction for the production's visuals and atmosphere. Hayao Miyazaki famously draws lots of rough watercolor image boards before each film to flesh out where he wants to go with the film.

絵コンテ Ekonte = Storyboard

After a script has been written, the storyboard is drawn. Ekonte literally means picture continuity. It is the blueprint of every anime. You can see a small example of a storyboard panel by Yoshiyuki Tomino here. Basically, it consists of a summary of what happens in each shot: a drawing showing the visuals, the length of the shot, the dialogue, sound effects, and camera instructions. Satoshi Kon once said that the storyboard is like another script; it should tell its own story.

Some storyboards like Tomino's are rougher and others more detailed. Satoshi Kon's were very detailed and could almost double as layouts. Most anime ekonte are in the same format. Each storyboarder has his or her own style. Some directors who can't draw get a talented animator to draw their storyboards based on the director's instructions. The storyboard for Isao Takahata's Only Yesterday was drawn by Yoshiyuki Momose, the one for his Gauche the Cellist by Toshitsugu Saida.

Different storyboarders have different standards for the amount of information they provide about what is supposed to happen in a shot. For a particularly important sequence, a storyboarder might devote several pages to visually depicting a single long shot that requires a particular succession of character movements, essentially creating a spare rough genga. Other storyboarders might leave it up to the animator to give them more freedom to have fun with the animation.

Knowledge of your animation staff's capabilities can affect the way a film or TV episode is storyboarded. You don't storyboard scenes requiring tricky, nuanced character acting if you know you don't have staff capable of bringing that sort of thing to life. Instead, you wind up storyboarding things in a 'safe' way that winds up being proportionately less communicative in terms of the directing. Conversely, storyboarders who know how to storyboard in a way that will involve the animation in the directing and who know they will be able to rely on good staff can produce more ambitious work. Satoshi Kon was only able to storyboard Tokyo Godfathers with all those long static shots of character acting because he knew he had staff like Hideki Hamasu and Shinji Otsuka who would be up to the task of animating his challenging shots.

Storyboards can be drawn by the same person who will go on to process the episode or movie (the enshutsu or technical director) or by a different person. Toei Animation is famous for not crediting storyboarders, only episode directors, because their episode directors are all expected to draw their own storyboards. (Not only this, Toei's episode directors are also supposed to take care of the voice recording sessions, something usually handled by the audio director, which perhaps helps account for why so many Toei directors developed into such auteurs.)

Normally the sequence in the storyboard is the final say, although I've run across some rare instances where storyboard shots were slightly altered by an ambitious key animator and kept in the final product. This happened in two instances I know of - in Soul Eater and Xam'd - and in both instances it was obvious why it was kept as is (because the animation was awesome), so although uncommon, it does happen occasionally if the animator really does something good with it. Usually I doubt this will be tolerated, and most animators would not do this.

Usually in Japanese animation, the storyboard for a movie or TV episode will all be done by the same person. On occasion, storyboards are done by several people. For example, in Bones' Tenpo Ibun Ayakashi, Akitoshi Yokoyama was given the credit of sento sekkei 戦闘設計 or battle design, a roundabout way of saying that he drew the storyboards for the battle sequences throughout the show. (In other words, one person would draw the storyboard for the episode, but just the battle portion would be storyboarded by Yokoyama.) He was given this unusual task due to his uncommon skill at conceptualizing action sequence in a way that makes exciting use of three-dimensional space. Norio Matsumoto storyboarded his action sequence in the third Naruto movie, as did Yutaka Nakamura in the Fullmetal Alchemist: Conqueror of Shambala movie.

Between storyboard & animation: Assigning shots and animation meetings

The next step after the storyboard has been drawn is to assign shots to animators. This is done by either the director or storyboarder or producer, or a combination of the like; I'm not sure exactly. The allocation is usually done according to animators' aptitudes. A storyboarder might even storyboard a sequence with a particular animator in mind.

After an animator has been assigned certain shots, the animator has a sit-down meeting with the director to talk about what the director wants from those shots. This is called a sakuga uchiawase 作画打合せ or animation meeting (saku-uchi 作打 for short). If an animator is unsure what is required of them from the storyboard, it's important for them to talk to the director or storyboarder at the animation meeting to find out what exactly is required of them so it doesn't cause problems down the line.

Animators are always given entire shots or sequences of shots, not just certain parts of a shot like in the west. They animate everything in a shot. In the old days, it was common for entire TV episodes to be animated by one or two animators. As time went on, more and more people were used to animate TV episodes. Nowadays it's not uncommon to see TV episodes with 30 key animators, many of whom may have only done one or two shots to help fill in the holes. Sometimes an animator did only one shot in an episode because that shot was particularly difficult or was something they're specialized in. (For example the way Hideki Kakita was called in in that recent Bleach episode to draw just one important shot of an explosion.)

The sakkan is occasionally credited at the end of the key animation credits to indicate that they drew a few shots to help fill in the holes. Key animation credits in anime are normally ordered according to number of shots animated. Sometimes a group of animators who contributed particularly significantly to an episode will be credited separately as a group.

Oftentimes, if an animator is assigned a shot, it's because the director knows what to expect from that animator, and that animator's particular style is desired for those shots. An animator who's particularly good at explosions, or robot kung fu, might be called in to do just those shots in an episode, and their animation won't be corrected despite looking slightly different from the rest of the show. Hence the trait that makes anime so unique: You'll find entire sequences animated in a style different from the rest of the show.

The extent to which this is tolerated or desired depends on various factors such as the nature of the production, the schedule, the director, and the episode director. Sometimes, as in the case of the first half of Samurai 7 episode 7, various circumstances led to the creation of a whole half episode in a very idiosyncratic style that didn't jibe with the rest of the show, but was very interesting as animation. That episode's director, Hiroyuki Okuno, is obviously the one who brought Hisashi Mori on to that episode, as they'd been associates for a long time.

Note: The term storyboard originally referred to color drawings pasted up on the wall to flesh out a film's direction, as they used to do it at Disney. Japanese ekonte are different. They're not brainstorming. They're the skeleton of the film; the final word on the length and content of every shot in a film. But storyboard has come to be used as the translation for ekonte.

レイアウト Reiauto = Layout

After a key animator has been assigned a shot, the first thing they have to do is to draw a layout, or a more detailed version of the image for that shot in the storyboard. The layout determines the relationship between the characters and the background. The background art will be drawn by the art department (bijutsu 美術) based on the layout. The layout gets checked by the director for content and then is passed on to the animation director to make corrections before it is given back to the key animator to proceed with drawing the actual keys.

In anime, the layout is almost always drawn by the key animator except in rare cases where a separate layout man is credited. The most famous examples are Isao Takahata's Heidi (1974), Marco (1976) and Anne (1979), in which Hayao Miyazaki drew the layout for every episode. Tsutomu Shibayama drew all the layouts for Osamu Dezaki's classic Gamba's Adventure (1975). The term gamen kosei 画面構成 or 'scene structure' was used in Heidi and Marco but the English word layout was used in Gamba. This may have been one of the first uses of the term in anime. 'Layout' was used in Anne.

原画 Genga = Key Animation

The next step after the layout has been approved and/or corrected by the animation director is for the key animator to draw the genga or key animation. Key animation is the heart of animation in anime. Many people have a hand in every shot of animation, but it's the key animator who creates the personality of that shot. To take character animation as an example, the key animator essentially draws the most important poses along the arc of a character's motion in a particular shot.

The key animator learns what he or she is supposed to draw in a particular shot from the storyboard and from the animation meeting held when their shots were assigned. The key animator needs to understand the story and what the director wants to convey in those shots before they start working.

Key animation isn't necessarily a place for flamboyant personal expression. Most of the time, the requirements are quite specific and leave little room for improvisation. But if an animator with an idiosyncratic style produces a piece of animation that stands out but is still good, there are many production environments that will not only allow it through, but not correct it. This depends on not only the sakkan but also the director to whom the sakkan is responsible. In other cases, they might just correct the faces but leave the basic movement intact. That's obviously what Hiroyuki Okuni did with Hisashi Mori's animation in Samurai 7 episode 7 in an attempt to make it more acceptable.

Different key animators have different aptitudes. Some are good at drawing faces on model and are called in for shots that require good character drawing skills but not necessarily good movement skills. Other animators are good at drawing vigorous physical actions. Others are good at effects like smoke and explosions.

In the early days, an animator would often do a whole episode or half episode. Nowadays, an animator typically handles a handful of shots in sequence. Nowadays if you see a solo episode outside of shows where that regularly occurs, it's usually a special thing like in Kaiba or Kemonozume, where the whole production is quite unique and artistically minded and the director gives a certain animator permission to animate a whole episode by themselves as a personal challenge.

Inbetweeners advance to key animation, and particularly talented key animators can then advance to working as animation directors or assistant animation directors, helping to correct the drawings, if they wish to.

第二原画 Daini Genga = Second Key Animation

Traditionally in anime, after key animation, the next step would be for the animation director to check the key animation and apply the necessary corrections to bring the characters to model. A new role was recently invented as a buffer between the key animator and the animation director: second key animation.

Nigen 二原 for short, second key animation is a relatively new concept in anime. This person does what in the west is known as "cleanup" - cleaning up the rough genga before they're passed on to the animation director to be checked. This step permits key animators to pump out more animation than if they had to produce a more polished shot. For example, an animator who might be good at action can draw several complicated shots in rough form in the time it might take them to draw one polished shot. A nigen would then clean it up. Infrequently you will also see a daiichi genga 第一原画 or first key animation credit, which is presumably a way of distinguishing between the people who drew the rough key animation intended to be cleaned up by the daini genga crew and the people who drew regular key animation.

(Note about the term Sakuga 作画: Sakuga is used among some western fans today to refer to flamboyant or particularly nice animation in anime, presumably something learned from the online Japanese community devoted to following animators, but in fact sakuga is just a generic word meaning "animation". You can have good sakuga and you can have bad sakuga; sakuga isn't a term of approbation. In old anime pre-dating Toei Doga (pre-1957), sakuga was one of the words used to credit the animators. Literally, it means "the person who drew the drawings". When used alone in latter-day anime, it often means that the person credited with sakuga drew all of the animation. Normally, animation would be broken down into genga (key animation) and doga (inbetweens), but if someone draws all of the animation themselves, they will be credited with sakuga.)

作画監督 Sakuga Kantoku = Animation Director

The sakuga kantoku or sakkan 作監 for short is the person who is in charge of looking at all of the key animation handed in by the key animators and, if it is too badly drawn or strays from the character design, correcting the drawing in part or in whole. The literal translation "animation director" can be misleading, because it seems to imply more of a creative say in filmmaking decisions than is actually the case. The movie Jin-Roh more accurately translated the term sakuga kantoku by using a less literal translation: "key animation supervisor".

The job of the animation director can be an arduous task, especially if working with animation outsourced to iffy studios who send in bad animation that needs to be thoroughly revised to be passable. Many animators would much prefer to draw animation than do sakkan work, even though presumably a sakkan may be better paid.

Every sakkan is different. They technically can correct everything if they want, including the time sheets, so the key animation could wind up looking completely different in the final product. Some sakkans correct everything, while others are more permissible and only correct the really bad work, either because they don't think it's necessary or don't have enough schedule. Tomonori Kogawa famously threw away much of the key animation he was given for the Ideon: Be Invoked movie and drew it from scratch himself because of his exacting standards, and because for him it was actually faster to do that than struggle to correct someone else's drawings.

Sometimes key animation is corrected, other times not. Sometimes a piece of animation may be flamboyant and stick out, but the animation director won't correct it because it's good animation by a well-known animator. In the past, key animators' work often went straight through into the final product. The Yuzo Aoki episode I blogged yesterday is an example, but there are many more. Aoki was sometimes credited as sakkan when he did solo key animation. An extreme example is Hajime Ningen Gyators: Takao Kosai is credited as the animation director, but he didn't correct any of the animation. Everything in the show is raw key animation by the animators. Credits in anime can be deceptive and ambiguous this way. Sometimes key animators aren't even credited due to some unknown behind-the-scenes circumstances.

Animator personality comes through often in action scenes because sakkans, who are often also the character designers, are more likely to devote their energy to correcting the faces than the movement, especially if the movement and drawings are good.

The term sakuga kantoku was coined in 1963, again at Toei Doga, for the role played by Yasuji Mori on the film Little Prince and the 8-Headed Dragon. Prior to that there was no single person overseeing the animation of an entire animated film in Japan as has become the norm today.

In recent days, the animation director role itself has become atomized into specialties. Common sub-credits include "mecha animation director" and "effects animation director".

総作画監督 Sou Sakuga Kantoku = Chief Animation Director

In the old days, when schedules were longer and there was not as much burden on the sakkan, it was only necessary to have one sakkan per TV episode or movie. In recent years, it has become common to see many sakkans in a single TV episode or movie. Yet another role was invented to supervise all these sakkans: the chief animation director.

This role was presumably created to ensure that this added level of supervisory complexity doesn't wind up having the opposite effect of creating visual disparity. The sou sakuga kantoku oversees all of the sakkans and maintains uniformity between them by adding corrections to their corrections, in much the same way as the sakkan does with respect to the key animators.

動画 Doga = Inbetween

After the drawings of the key animator have been checked by the director and the animation director(s), the next step is for the animation to be inbetweened by the doga or inbetweener.

Genga and Doga are an inseparable unit. The inbetweener fills in the movement of the key animation. How this is done isn't arbitrary. The key animator determines what poses the inbetweener is to draw, and where, using what's called a time sheet and a tsume shiji つめ指示 or timing chart. See this set of key animation drawings from my post on Shoichi Masuo for an example of a tsume shiji, and this one for its accompanying time sheet. The tsume shiji is the part that looks like this in the key animation drawings: ├────────┼────┼─┼┼┼┼┤ (see here for a more detailed explanation of what this means.) The key animator may also draw nakawari sanko 中割り参考 or inbetweening references for particularly complicated shots. The inbetweener is also responsible for cleaning up the lines of the key animation and preparing the drawings to be handed to the next department, the coloring department.

Unlike key animation, inbetweening doesn't leave much room for personal expression. It's where you are supposed to bring alive the expression of the key animation. The inbetweener draws the instructed drawings, and that's all. But inbetweening does require considerable skill in its own way. Badly inbetweened animation can ruin a shot of perfectly good key animation, while good inbetweens can improve mediocre key animation.

Traditionally, animators in Japan go through a period of apprenticeship as inbetweeners before acceding to key animation. One day they're offered the chance to give key animation a shot, and from then on out they're key animators. How quickly this happens depends on the studio and the animator. Some turn in bad animation and are sent back to inbetweening. Some choose to remain inbetweeners. You'll often spot a random famous animator in the inbetween credits if you watch a lot of old shows. Some of today's young talented gif animators like Kenichi Kutsuna and Ryosuke Sawa (Ryo~timo) skipped the inbetweening apprenticeship step and did key animation right off the bat.

After the inbetweener has done his or her job, the doga kensa 動画検査 or inbetween checker inspects the inbetweens. They're like the animation director for the final inbetweened animation. After that, the animation is sent to be colored by the shiage 仕上げ or finishing (now sometimes called digital paint) department and then to the photography (now sometimes compositing) department.

The term doga literally means 'moving drawings'. Doga was coined by Kenzo Masaoka (1898-1988) so that the Japanese would have their own word for animation instead of having to borrow the western word animation. Kenzo Masaoka is considered the father of anime for his pioneering work in the 1930s and 1940s. Thus, initially, doga actually meant simply animation in the broad sense of the term. It seems to have been around the time that Toei Doga (=Toei Animation) was founded in 1956 (when Toei purchased Nichido) that the genga/doga duality came into play and doga began to be used exclusively to mean inbetween animation.

(Aside: Sometimes a DVD will contain footage of the actual raw animation drawings. The term Genga Satsuei 原画撮影 or Gensatsu 原撮 for short refers to footage of just the key animation drawings, without backgrounds, sound effects, music or anything. Similarly, the term Doga Satsuei or Dosatsu 動撮 for short refers to footage of the fully inbetweened animation (i.e. key anmation + inbeteweens).)

演出 Enshutsu = Episode Director (TV) or Technical Director (movie)

監督 Kantoku = Director

There are various terms for director in anime, which can be confusing. The kantoku or director is the one who oversees the whole project, steering it towards completion by coordinating the various main staff, and making important creative decisions about the project as a whole. The enshutsu or technical director is responsible to the director, and does the physical work of putting together all the components (art, animation, sound) into the final product. As I mentioned above, the animation director is not a 'director' in the same sense. The animation director mainly just corrects key animation. Animation directors answer to both the director and the technical director.

In a movie, the kantoku or director has most of the creative control. The enshutsu or technical director in a movie is there mostly to alleviate the burden on the kantoku by handling the technical tasks that the director might not know about or might not have time to take care of. The director might now know certain photographic techniques, and would rely for this on an enshutsu with more experience in such matters. The enshutsu might also check layouts or key animation for the kantoku and correct lines of dialogue or drawings in a pinch. Ko Matsuo and Shogo Furuya helped Satoshi Kon tremendously in this role on his films.

Among other things, the director is there to make sure things are on track. The director of a TV series checks the storyboards for each episode, and may in fact re-do them or have them re-done if they're not satisfactory. Satoshi Kon had to re-draw the storyboard by Shogo Furuya in episode 2 of Paranoia Agent, and Hayao Miyazaki reportedly re-drew the storyboards submitted by Yoshiyuki Tomino on Future Boy Conan from scratch even though Tomino is still credited. These rejected storyboards might have gotten accepted under other circumstances (Tomino was widely relied upon for his storyboards), but the chief directors happened to be auteurs with exceptionally exacting artistic standards.

In the old days, enshutsu was used to refer to the director of a whole TV series. Nowadays, the word kantoku is used for that purpose, and each episode of a TV series has its own sub-director who oversees that particular episode. The episode director is referred to as the enshutsu. I assume the more holistic and supervisory role of kantoku evolved in the natural course of things as productions became more complex and production methods evolved accordingly.

Enshutsu seems to entail something quite different in a TV environment. The basic job of episode director is to hold meetings with and coordinate the heads of the different sections - animation, art, coloring, photography - in such a way as to achieve the objectives of the storyboard, which is ideally drawn by the episode director, but often these days is drawn by someone else. The episode director checks layouts and key animation as they are handed in to make sure the key animator drew what was required in the storyboard, calling for a retake if not, otherwise passing the key animation on to the sakkan. After everything is assembled, the episode director is responsible for getting any mistakes taken care of and putting together the final package.

Other tasks of an episode director incllude marking the rush copy used during voice actor recording sessions in such a way that the voice actors know when to read their lines. If everything isn't ready by the time of dubbing, they put together a provisional rush copy of an episode using raw materials like key animation or inbetweens so that the voice actors will have some visual material to work with. Episode directors also put together next episode previews by choosing which shots to use in the preview from those that are complete.

Episode directors in a TV series seem to have comparably much more control over the creative outcome of an episode than the enshutsu in a movie. They're essentially a mini kantoku. Thus you can get an episode like Mitsuo Iso's episode of RahXephon that's remarkably different in tone and style from the rest of the series due to the tight control exercised over the episode by the director of that particular episode. Although naturally, the director of the series would have to approve whatever the episode director decides to do. Talented storyboarders/directors like Keiichi Hara, Hosoda Mamoru and Atsushi Wakabayashi honed their talent working on TV shows where they were allowed to direct episodes in their own particular style.

Almost all anime TV series have a director supervising the whole show and a separate episode director for each episode. TMS's Hajime Ningen Gyators Group Tac's Manga Nihon Mukashibanashi are among the few examples I know of that didn't have a series director, only episode directors.

Yet another level was added to this already complicated hierarchy with the recent creation of the role of Sou Kantoku 総監督 or chief director. Some productions have a chief director, a director and a technical director.

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26 comments

Khwan
Khwan [Visitor]

Timesheet or X-sheet determines where the drawing will be in the timeline.
It doesn’t tell how the inbetweener will draw each pose.

They use “timing chart” for that.
http://www.brianlemay.com/Pages/animationschool/animation/lipsyncbook/timingcharts.html

10/24/11 @ 05:35
Ben [Member]  

Thanks for the correction. I’ll correct the text. The Japanese have their own term: tsume shiji.

10/24/11 @ 08:55
mike
mike [Visitor]

Excellent post, I’d been wanting to find more information about the goings-on in anime. Interesting note on the term “sakuga” too, as seeing that term being batted all over the place can get a little confusing.

I wonder, though, doesn’t the addition of a “chief director” sound a little redundant? At first glance, it seems like having too many cooks in the kitchen, especially if the “kantoku” is a particularly skilled one. But they’ve managed to thrive under the system, anyway, so maybe it’s just me.

10/24/11 @ 11:26
Ben [Member]  

Thanks. Glad it helped a bit.

I feel the same way about the whole chief director thing. It seems unnecessary. I don’t understand who is doing what when I see a production with a chief director AND a director AND an enshutsu, apart from a vague notion that a chief director has been added over the director to add another level of supervision. It’s a relatively new thing to have a chief director and a director, so I’m still a little unclear on exactly what the division of duties is between the chief director and the director. I suspect it varies from production to production, since it isn’t the norm.

10/24/11 @ 11:44
jrsmith
jrsmith [Visitor]

Really informative post. Thanks Ben.
I wonder if you could clarify the genga/doga distinction during the early Toei days because it’s my understanding that it wasn’t so simple as genga=key animation and doga=inbetweening. I thought genga was more a credit of seniority and that those credited with doga would do key animation in addition to inbetweening. Many of those who did inbetweening would receive no screen credit at all, such as Miyazaki on Wanwan Chushingura. Any idea when these credits became more standardized?
Also, do you know what a 動画監修 doga kanshuu does compared to a sakuga kantoku? Is it just an antiquated term?

10/24/11 @ 12:11
kraker2k
kraker2k [Member]

Really nice post, thanks!
I have always wondered about 2nd KA so that has really cleared things up. I’ve also thought if there was any significance to the order of the KAs in the credits. My own assumption was that it indicated the order in which the KA’s work appeared in an episode. But it seems your explanation makes more sense.

Interesting you mention the layout and checks, I was reading Masami Obari’s twitter recently and he said he got back a layout, but it had no corrections from the sakkan, he was wondering if this was really okay. Your post just made it easier to understand what he was on about.

Though I do have a question that I’ve wondered about and that is; what role do producers play in an anime? From interviews I’ve watched, it seems some of them often take part in the productions and meetings themselves and often give their own input to help guide the production of a particular show. Is this correct and is there any more light you can perhaps shed on this?

10/24/11 @ 13:52
drmecha
drmecha [Visitor]

I checked many staffs of TV series from different decades. Apparently the key animator position (in TV series) began to generalize about the year 1980. APPARENTLY it was in that year or shortly before it. Before the same animator performing the interleaving of the scene.
The exception was the movies. I only know staffs of classic Toei films (60s, 70s), but not those of other old producers.
About the number of key animators, at the time I was surprised the amount of key animators who worked on each chapter in the Z-Gundam series. In some think I counted 15 or 20 animators!
Here de complete Z-Gundam staff:
http://www.geocities.co.jp/Playtown/3064/Kszg.htm

10/24/11 @ 17:43
neshru
neshru [Member]

Wow, Ben. I don’t know where you find the time to write stuff like this these days, but I’m sure glad that you do :P
Incredibly detailed post on the matter.

mike: about chief directors being redundant, it probably depends on the project they’re used on, because there are cases where their use is justified. For example, on the Naruto Shippuden series a Chief Animation Director is used to correct the drawings on episodes that have been entirely outsourced to crappy studios. In that particular case, the improvement in drawing quality is absolutely noticeable and totally worth the use of a chief director.

Anyway, speaking of Naruto Shippuden, I think it has a very good example of just how much the Animation Director can affect not only the drawing style, but also the movement of the animation he corrects: episode 178 of the series had each half handled by a different AD, and the difference between the first half (done by Kumiko Horikoshi, a pretty standard AD on the series) and the second half (done by Hiroyuki Yamashita, a talented animator) is like night and day.

10/25/11 @ 12:40
Ben [Member]  

jrsmith:

Thanks! My pleasure. Where was Doga Kanshu used? On an old show? It could be just an antiquated term for Doga Check, as you say. There are so many permutations of each role that have been used throughout history. About your question, that’s a good question. I’m looking into it right now to make sure I have the details right…

Kraker2k:

Glad it helped! As for what a producer does, that’s a really good question. A book could be written about what a producer’s job is. Every producer is different, and the role has changed over time. I’m doing a little research before I give you a response…

Neshru:

Thanks, that’s nice to hear. I’m pushing myself to write more, glad this post was helpful to people. I tried not to go into too much gory detail about each task. I just wanted to give a brief sense of the flow. But it still wound up being pretty long. There’s always more you could say about this subject…

I think Mike and I were wondering more about chief director versus director, not chief animation director versus animation director. I have a pretty clear sense of what a chief animation director does in films, even in tv shows. But you’re right, since time immemorial there have been fans following specific animation directors. One of the first things many people notice about anime as kids is how each episode kind of looks different. They eventually correlate the drawings they like to specific sakkans, and start following their work. That’s how many anime fans got interested in the staff side of things over the years.

I remember the half-episode Hiroyuki Yamashita sakkan’d a while back. It was really nice. I liked how drastically the drawings (and even movement) changed as soon as you hit the second half done by Yamashita. Looking forward to see where he goes.

10/26/11 @ 23:57
jrsmith
jrsmith [Visitor]

RE: Doga Kanshu
I’ve been checking the credits to old Toei features to see how various terms evolved. Doga Kanshu was a credit that could be found on the four films from Saiyuki to Little Prince and the Eight-Headed Dragon and was always credited to Sanae Yamamoto. This presumably means it was a different function than Yasuji Mori’s role as animation director on Little Prince, since the two credits exist on the same film. By the way, Mori is credited as Genga Kantoku on Little Prince, not Sakuga Kantoku. On Wanwan Chushingura, Sanae Yamamoto along with Taiji Yabushita are credited with simply Kanshu, and the term Doga Kanshu doesn’t appear again as far as I know. I think Wanwan Chushingura might be the actual first film where the term Sakuga Kantoku appears, which was Akira Daikubara’s credit for presumably performing the same duties as Mori in Little Prince. But then, for whatever reason, Toei goes back to using Genga Kantoku for Gulliver’s Travels in Space, before finally settling on Sakuga Kantoku for subsequent films. It’s all a bit confusing.

10/27/11 @ 03:13
mike
mike [Visitor]

@neshru, Ben:

Yeah, I’ve been mostly wondering about the relationship between the chief director and the director (though I’ve also wondered about the chief ADs and ADs before).

I don’t know how it is with other productions, but when I watch, say, Mawaru Penguindrum, I’m always baffled by it. The title of “chief director", to me, seems to imply a level of superiority in the anime production line (it’s obviously not the case in Pendrum, but still). So on that note–and I’m not going to knock on anybody here–seeing Shouko Nakamura with that title of “chief director” and Ikuhara listed as “director” strikes me as more than a little odd, somehow.

10/27/11 @ 09:09
cbrubaker
cbrubaker [Member]

Thanks for the post. Very helpful.

I’d figured that Toei’s episode/technical director did all the storyboards themselves judging by the credits. Glad I wasn’t wrong.

Speaking of which, I noticed that in some of the episodes for Calimero (the ’70s Toei series based on an Italian character), Fusahiro Nagaki was credited for BOTH Enshutsu and Sakuga Kantoku. How often did an episode director also pulled double duty for animation direction?

And speaking of which, how long does it typically take to finish an episode from start to finish? Generally in Western shows it takes 9 months (as with the Simpsons), although there are odd examples like “South Park", which literally takes a week to complete.

10/27/11 @ 16:34
Will
Will [Visitor]

Nice and informative Ben!
It took a while for me to understand the difference between an enshutsu and kantoku since we don’t really have enshutsu here either.

Also, sometimes enshutsu is responsible for the pacing of the episode. From what I was told, usually production people become enshutsu due to there knowledge of how a show works and working with the director so closely.

10/27/11 @ 22:08
Ben [Member]  

jrsmith:

Looking into it and thinking about it, I came to the conclusion that Sanae Yamamoto’s credit of Doga Kanshu could not possibly be anything related to actual checking of animation. It had to be just a supervisory role, perhaps providing guidance to young animators if they have questions. This is a guy who was already an executive at the new company, and he had been an animator since 1925, so there’s no way he would be doing such a lowly task. Confirmation of this suppostion came from an interview with Makoto Nagasawa, who was an animator in the Toei Doga films of the time, in which he says that Yamamoto wasn’t involved whatsoever in the animation side of things. Yamamoto was the president of Nichido, which was bought by Toei, so it must have been his honorarium. Incidentally, he quit Toei Doga in 1964, which is why Gulliver is his last credit in this capacity. Taiji Yabushita is presumably credited alongside him with kanshu to indicate that he provided the new younger directors Daisaku Shirakawa and Yoshio Kuroda with guidance, as Yabushita was also from the previous generation who founded animation in Japan and co-founder of Nichido alongside Sanae (Zenjiro) Yamamoto. Yabushita quit in 1967.

Interestingly, in a book I have published in 1988 by Toei Doga, they write Mori’s credit on Little Prince and the 8-Headed Dragon as Sakuga Kantoku, not Genga Kantoku, although I assume the original film listed him as Genga Kantoku. (don’t have it on hand right now to confirm, but I assume that’s where you got this info) It goes to show that the term was a new concept - they were still unsure what word to use to describe it for a few years before settling on Sakuga Kantoku. I think Genga Kantoku is a better term. It better indicates the scope of duties of the task. (kantoku can be translated as supervisor depending on the circumstances; i.e. construction site supervisor, which ironically could lead full circle to the wording “key animation supervisor” that Jin-Roh used)

Charles:

That’s an interesting phenomenon. It’s not extremely common, but it does occur surprisingly frequently. Off the top of my head I can think of a few instances - Anime R’s Kazuaki Mouri did the konte/enshusu/sakkan/genga on a few episodes of Yadamon. Tweeny Witches was a cool show because you saw a lot of this sort of thing - see this post. I didn’t list the genga credits in that post, but I assume that at least a few of those by Aoki and Furuya might have even been solo genga episodes. I really like it when I see an episode like this. It’s such a show of power on the part of the person doing it. I think it’s pretty uncommon for someone to have the skill to be able to do that. You know they’re exceptionally talented if they can pull that off. Though I’m sure in some instances scheduling factors must have come into play. But still, even if they have someone do that because of lack of schedule, there aren’t many people capable of pulling it off.

As for how long it takes to complete an episode, that can vary depending on a lot of factors, not least from what point you’re counting. From storyboarding to “kan pake” 完パケ (as they call the finished product) I think nowadays it’s generally between 1 month and 3 months. On Tetsuwan Atom they were spending about two weeks from animation to dubbing and editing per episode. If they have more schedule they might spend longer. I seem to recall some particularly lavish episode 1s with a big lead time had a production period of up to 6 months. Mihara Michio’s insane episode 4 of Kaiba took him 9 months to make solo.

10/29/11 @ 16:42
h_park
h_park [Member]

Ben,
I’m glad to see you writing a post about Japanese production process. After all these years talking about roles and processes piece by piecew, it’s nice to have one consolidated information based on thorough research. To fans, it’s very mysterious because the system is different from what we do in the U.S.

I know this is a wishful thinking, but it would be nice if some art patron/benefactor sends you to Japan for 3 month for first hand experience as a production assistant. I never doubt your meticulous research, however the actual experience solidifies your research better and I’m sure you have some nagging questions that cannot be answered via internet and printed materials.

10/30/11 @ 01:38
jancko
jancko [Visitor]

hi, I’ve heard that in japanese animation the voice recording comes after the animation is done, do you know how the key animator draws all the mouth positions or length of the dialog without any voice recording?
thanks for your time

10/30/11 @ 11:44
Ben [Member]  

H Park:

You’re right, we’d been talking about this stuff for years and many of us probably knew it vaguely, but I thought it was a good opportunity to put together all the basic knowledge about staff roles in one place in a clearly organized way.

Heh, I’d love it if someone did that too! You’re absolutely right. There are tons of little nagging questions about minute details that I just can’t figure out without being there myself, no matter how many hours I spend researching.

jancko:

The mouth positions are standardized into a small number of shapes, due in part to the fewer number of mouth shapes required by the Japanese language, so usually they just alternate between a stock two or three shapes, and the audience interpolates the rest without realizing it. The mouths are made small to accommodate this. The length of the dialogue is indicated in the storyboard. The animator draws the animation for the mouth movement on a separate layer and indicates the timing for the mouth movement according to the storyboard. Then in the studio the voice-actors have to say their lines while the mouth is moving.

10/31/11 @ 14:38
AzureNimbus
AzureNimbus [Member]

This post was fantastic. It really addressed all the questions I asked and went way beyond what I had imagined. It also obviously made me think of several NEW questions and points. If everything I say below is utterly obvious, please excuse my ignorance :)

I was fascinated about the idea of anime directors that can’t draw getting someone else to make their storyboards. Would I be wrong in assuming you meant Isao Takahata is one of those that can’t draw? That sounds so impossible, but if it is the case, that would be absolutely remarkable. What other great anime directors are known for not being able to draw? In other words, I guess I’m asking is, are there big anime directors that were not originally animators? For one reason or another, I thought that it was a given that in this industry, directors were always animators who managed to climb up the production ladder.

All the mentions of in-depth aspects of Satoshi Kon’s work made me feel a certain grief for his departure. Strangely, I feel I haven’t yet let go, and am constantly having to remind myself there won’t be any more from him (except for his last unfinished project… but I wonder how much of him will be in it). It was so sudden. In any case, the light you’ve shed on some of the production trivia behind his films made me appreciate them even more.

I’m curious about the fact that the storyboard also includes the length of the shot. Knowing the way the Japanese value discipline and hierarchy, I wonder if what the director decides will be the length is unquestionable and expected to be followed to precision, or if it’s just a general guideline.

What are some of the places you find samples of storyboards and key animation, etc.? You mentioned in the post that Soul Eater and Xam’d had examples of storyboards that were not followed completely by the key animators. But how do you know, did you actually see it and compared it or was it something that people from the industry talked about? Do you usually have access to these types of material?

You mentioned that Norio Matsumoto, for example, storyboarded his action sequence in the third Naruto movie. But here’s a question, isn’t that redundant, if he’s drawing all the key animation for that sequence? What use would the storyboard have been once he had done the key animation? Or is it that for some reason there can never be key animation done without it being based on a storyboard, even though it’s the same person working on both?

I have a very simple (and possibly naive) question about key animation. Is every key animator in anime supposed to draw what happens to all the elements in a given shot/sequence? For some reason I always thought some key animators would work with just one or some characters, for example. Is that a Western thing?

The info about how usually animators who performed important work in a specific piece of work receive prominence in the credits is the kind of subtle hint that a newbie such as myself appreciates immensely. I’ve often wondered if there are some secrets to how people can tell so easily who animated which shots, besides simply recognizing the style. If there are more ways of knowing exactly who did what, please let us know.

You mentioned how the ekonte is different from the Disney storyboards. But while reading I was thinking something else. The ekonte actually sounds very different from what modern storyboards look like in film, for instance. From my understanding, film storyboards are almost like graphic novels with more visual information and less words. I’m basing this comparison on the example you posted of Tomino’s SB. Perhaps a very visual storyboard with detailed panel progressions of camerawork, etc, would restrict the key animation too much, and so it does not exist in Japanese animation? I wonder how it works in a place like Pixar, for instance.

That is a good question on its own. What are the main obvious differences you are aware of between the anime industry and commercial hollywood 3d animation?

Something that I have always wondered about is the amazing capacity Japanese anime has to replicate the style of the original manga, when there is one. There is an amazing amount of respect for the source material. Even though very often the story differs, the fact that so much effort is put into retaining a very close resemblance to the author’s drawings (mostly of the characters and their expressions) is impressive to me. My question is: is the animation director the only one responsible for this? How much is expected of the key animators and inbetweeners when it comes to, for instance, keeping Oda’s style in the average One Piece shot? There are some very unusual manga styles out there that have been flawlessly translated to anime (Kaiji and Akagi by Nobuyuki Fukumoto come to mind). I can’t imagine that the key animators and inbetweeners would have to spend time studying and learning how to draw like the mangaka… or would they?

Just to clarify, in this instance I’m talking about general mainstream adaptation anime when it’s not being too original and expressive, which is most of the time.

Also, you mentioned in passing that the animation director is often also the character designer. So is it that the exception to that ‘rule’ is when they hire a “star” character designer with a name, such as Yoshiyuki Sadamoto, Yoshitaka Amano or even CLAMP (in Code Geass, for example)? In those cases, I imagine they create the models and then some other guy works as the sakkan to keep their vision intact?

Another simple question is: how are the drawings corrected? What are the materials actually involved? Is it still all done in paper? When the sakkan makes the corrections, is it somehow layered on the original or does he simply erase what the key animator has done?

“Badly inbetweened animation can ruin a shot of perfectly good key animation". I’d love to see an example of this, if you could remember one. I think it would be very illustrative of the two different types of animation, that can so easily blend together for the common viewer as one single thing.

About the role of the technical director in a movie, I think it’s very interesting that according to you they have less creative control than an episode director in a tv series. It seems to me that from what we’re seeing here, the de facto directors of tv series are the episode directors, and that is why in anime episodes so often work as mini-movies that feel quite different from each other. In that sense, it’s almost like the kantoku in a series might have a role that requires very little creative input, like a supervisor, but perhaps with very little hands-on? Of course, that would vary. With people ilke Satoshi Kon and Miyazaki, like you said, that wouldn’t apply.

I think the key here is looking into whether the kantoku had any involvement with the script and the storyboard. I looked around a little bit, and in Evangelion, for instance, Anno was involved with the script in nearly all the episodes and drew the storyboard for 10 of them. That seems like a good indication that the episode directors in that show had a smaller input than the kantoku. And if you take one of the more dismissible shows by Akiyuki Shinbo, such as the recent Denpa Onna to Seishun Otoko (chief director), you see that he actually had no involvement in storyboarding, which I think might explain why it doesn’t stand out in any way. Cossette and the episodes he storyboarded in SoulTaker are examples of what he can achieve if he steps down from the ’supervising-only’ chair.

So that leads me to wondering what exactly is the dynamics between Hideaki Anno and his pupil Kazuya Tsurumaki in the current Evangelion remake movies. Tsurumaki was highly involved with the original series, storyboarding and directing several episodes, but he only came to shine on his own once he got to be the main force behind FLCL. The tone and general direction of these two works are very different, and it’s easy to see that Anno dominated Eva. Does this mean that after FLCL and Diebuster Tsurumaki has now somewhat devolved into Anno’s quasi-assistant for the recent films? He is listed as director (under Anno’s Chief Director).

Phew, I think that’s it for now. Thanks again, Ben. You might think that this is basic, but I’m sure for a lot of people like me, this is an unbelievable treat. There will be a lot of linking done on my part, as I know quite a few people that would be interested in learning about this. I will also read the post you linked to in your forums later.

And BTW, don’t worry, I plan on becoming a billionaire in the near future, and I shall definitely send you to Japan.

11/01/11 @ 01:57
AzureNimbus
AzureNimbus [Member]

(It seems the next post addresses some of the questions I just made, so forgive me for not having read that first. I will read and comment on that one soon.)

11/01/11 @ 01:59
beldenotaku
beldenotaku [Visitor]

Thank you for the posting and great detail. I’m actually interested in becoming an animator in Japan, and I’ve been looking for quite a while for a detailed explanation of the animation process and I’ve got to say, you’ve more than answered all my questions and now I feel like I can better explain it to other people.
I didn’t realize that much of the process was divided up, I knew of key animators and in-betweeners, but I never thought that they had a separate artist for coloring and composition, though, in retrospect it makes sense.
Thanks again, you have no idea how excited I was to see such an in-depth explanation. :3

11/07/11 @ 20:37
Will
Will [Visitor]

HPark & jancko:

You’re very close!
I believe you’re right up to the mouth timing on the storyboards. The boards doesn’t show the length of the dialogue but the length of the shot. The dialogue is timed out on the dopesheet, xsheet or timing sheet, whatever you want to call it.
I’ve noticed recently some shows have started to lip sync their dialogue for more creative reasons. I’m sure those have to be timed out and charted before layouts.

11/08/11 @ 19:11
Joojoobees
Joojoobees [Visitor]

Thanks so much for this. I learned a lot. It is always fascinating to find out about how people put together this complex art form.

11/12/11 @ 22:10
h_park
h_park [Member]

Will,

You got the wrong person. I didn’t say anything about mouth timing.

11/13/11 @ 02:09
mister x
mister x [Visitor]

Sorry if this has already been answered in the comments, but I have a quick question:

When watching a lot of pre-2000 era anime (and even some 2000 era anime) I noticed slight changes in art style between episodes. Is that the work of the sakkan? Correcting the animation to match his specific style? Shows that come to mind are Evangelion and Bebop, but you see this in basically everything until stuff switched to digital.

11/23/11 @ 04:11
Ben [Member]  

AzureNimbus:

Sorry my reply took so long. You asked a lot of good questions that I felt were worth answering in as much depth as I could, and I haven’t had time to give an in-depth response until now.

I was fascinated about the idea of anime directors that can’t draw getting someone else to make their storyboards. Would I be wrong in assuming you meant Isao Takahata is one of those that can’t draw? That sounds so impossible, but if it is the case, that would be absolutely remarkable. What other great anime directors are known for not being able to draw? In other words, I guess I’m asking is, are there big anime directors that were not originally animators? For one reason or another, I thought that it was a given that in this industry, directors were always animators who managed to climb up the production ladder.

First, yes, sorry it was unclear: Isao Takahata can’t really draw. I think he draws a rough storyboard first with ‘maruchon’ (a circle with two dots for the head and eyes of a character) that his appointed animation storyboarder then converts into a proper storyboard. If you buy his storyboards released by Ghibli you’ll be able to see that they’re each drawn by a different person, not by him. I don’t think there are many other directors like him who can’t draw and who convey their instructions verbally or in writing to a storyboarder. Masaaki Oosumi is one of the few others I can think of. But there are plenty of directors who didn’t start out as animators. Many started out with the express intent of directing, so they started as assistant directors before becoming directors. Others wandered in by chance. Akitaro Daichi worked as an anime photographer for 5 years before swithcing to ‘running’ (seisaku shinko) and eventually directing. Mamoru Oshii started out directing radio shows before switching careers and joining Tatsunoko by chance to work as a helper at the studio. He got offered a job directing only because they were short of hands. Thank god he happened to see their ad in the paper one day or he would never have wandered into anime.

I’m curious about the fact that the storyboard also includes the length of the shot. Knowing the way the Japanese value discipline and hierarchy, I wonder if what the director decides will be the length is unquestionable and expected to be followed to precision, or if it’s just a general guideline.

Regarding the length of the shot, make no mistake, what’s written in the storyboard is expected to be followed precisely. Timing may wind up having to be tweaked after all of the animation has been turned in to make sure it fits into the allotted time, but the timing in the storyboard isn’t meant just as a guideline; it’s meant to be a precise measure.

What are some of the places you find samples of storyboards and key animation, etc.? You mentioned in the post that Soul Eater and Xam’d had examples of storyboards that were not followed completely by the key animators. But how do you know, did you actually see it and compared it or was it something that people from the industry talked about? Do you usually have access to these types of material?

As for where to find storyboard and other materials, well, we are very lucky people today. We live in a time where this kind of material is readily available online as well as in print. Storyboard books have been published for most major movies - Oshii’s films, all the Ghibli films, Hosoda’s films. You find storyboard books as extras in lots of DVDs. (Genius Party, Mind Game) In other cases, raw material gets sold in Japan on the market at a marked up price and finds its way online. In other cases, studios put up material on the official web site. As it happens, I learned about the changes that were made to the storyboards in Xam’d from the official web site, which had a really nice ‘making of’ section that included a choice shot of animation from each episode selected by the chief animation director, Masashi Okumura. One of the shots he happened to select for one of the episodes was one animated by an animator named Masanori Shibata. It’s actually still online. Go to this site and click on the second circle and then click on #8. That’s the shot. It was originally supposed to be two shots, but the animator, on his own initiative, changed it to one shot. Okumura himself says in the commentary that this is something normally that you’re not supposed to do, but they left it in because it was good. The other one I heard from someone who worked on the show.

I really like this feature they did on the Xam’d webpage. The one for #15 shows you not movement but all of the layers in a single shot, and how they stack over one another. What a great idea to do that.

You mentioned that Norio Matsumoto, for example, storyboarded his action sequence in the third Naruto movie. But here’s a question, isn’t that redundant, if he’s drawing all the key animation for that sequence? What use would the storyboard have been once he had done the key animation? Or is it that for some reason there can never be key animation done without it being based on a storyboard, even though it’s the same person working on both?

That’s a very good question that would probably be better explained by someone with experience in the matter, but I’ll give it my intuitive stab. I guess it’s like building a house: You wouldn’t just run up and start working without a blueprint. Drawing a storyboard before animating is a convention borne of experience in the industry. It may seem redundant to draw a storyboard if you’re going to animate the scene too, but you have to have a basic sense of how the scene is going to flow before you start drawing the final key animation drawings, or it could lead to continuity or timing problems, not to mention slowing you down because you have to think about what to do with the next shot on the fly as you move forward, while also making sure the scene works overall. In a way, it’s just a convention. Tasks have been compartmentalized in the industry in a way that maximizes efficiency. You work your way from the top down, from the big picture to the little details. Story to script. Script to Storyboard. Storyboard to layout. Layout to key animation. Could you start drawing a storyboard without a script? Sure, but then you’re going to have to be twice as talented, and there aren’t many people who can both come up with both a great screenplay AND its visual expression on the fly. Except maybe Miyazaki.

I have a very simple (and possibly naive) question about key animation. Is every key animator in anime supposed to draw what happens to all the elements in a given shot/sequence? For some reason I always thought some key animators would work with just one or some characters, for example. Is that a Western thing?

The Japanese and Western systems are different in this regard. You’re absolutely right: In anime, every key animator is supposed to draw every element in his or her shot. There were some oddball productions like Cleopatra and Jack and the Beanstalk that adopted the western ‘character system’, but they were exceptions to the rule. Animators are assigned by shot, not by character. Normally an animator will be given a sequential series of shots, but often an animator will be assigned just one odd shot to help fill in the blanks. A lot could probably be written about how this small difference has fundamentally altered the nature of Japanese animation, by changing a key aspect of how character animation is conceptualized.

The info about how usually animators who performed important work in a specific piece of work receive prominence in the credits is the kind of subtle hint that a newbie such as myself appreciates immensely. I’ve often wondered if there are some secrets to how people can tell so easily who animated which shots, besides simply recognizing the style. If there are more ways of knowing exactly who did what, please let us know.

The credits in anime have always been frustrating to me. I’ve never found a clear explanation as to what they signify. The problem is, what they signify can vary wildly from show to show and year to year. Every studio and show seems to come up with new ways of dividing up the key animation credits that seem to serve absolutely no purpose but to confuse you and make you wonder what it means. My basic understanding has for a long time been that the credits are usually listed in the order of shots animated. But what about when there are separate groups? Or one person is listed alone at the bottom? It’s really confusing and you have to figure it out on a case-by-case basis. That’s why the presentation of the key animation credits is actually a significant piece of information; it won’t do when translating key animation credits to just ignore the ordering and list the names alphabetically.

There isn’t really any other way of telling who did what shot other than to judge by the style. The credits unfortunately do not tell you that information, though they give you hints. If you see a big chunk of people listed together, and then a small number of people credited in a grouping a slight distance away, for example, that obviously means something; perhaps they worked as a team on the big action sequence in the episode.

You mentioned how the ekonte is different from the Disney storyboards. But while reading I was thinking something else. The ekonte actually sounds very different from what modern storyboards look like in film, for instance. From my understanding, film storyboards are almost like graphic novels with more visual information and less words. I’m basing this comparison on the example you posted of Tomino’s SB. Perhaps a very visual storyboard with detailed panel progressions of camerawork, etc, would restrict the key animation too much, and so it does not exist in Japanese animation? I wonder how it works in a place like Pixar, for instance.

Japanese storyboards provide the skeleton of the film, and nothing more. There’s no way they could function otherwise on such short schedules. There’s no point in lavishly drawing each storyboard panel when the animator is going to draw the layout. The Japanese storyboards do provide information about camerawork, though perhaps that wasn’t shown in the Tomino example. They also provide timing information, sound effects information, dialogue information. As I mentioned, some storyboards go into considerable detail about the acting and progression of a particular shot. Others are more vague about specifically to leave the animator more freedom. It really depends on the director. Unfortunately I know nothing about the way things are done in modern western theatrical CG productions, so I can’t help provide a counterpoint in that regard.

Something that I have always wondered about is the amazing capacity Japanese anime has to replicate the style of the original manga, when there is one. There is an amazing amount of respect for the source material. Even though very often the story differs, the fact that so much effort is put into retaining a very close resemblance to the author’s drawings (mostly of the characters and their expressions) is impressive to me. My question is: is the animation director the only one responsible for this? How much is expected of the key animators and inbetweeners when it comes to, for instance, keeping Oda’s style in the average One Piece shot? There are some very unusual manga styles out there that have been flawlessly translated to anime (Kaiji and Akagi by Nobuyuki Fukumoto come to mind). I can’t imagine that the key animators and inbetweeners would have to spend time studying and learning how to draw like the mangaka… or would they?

That’s what the character designs are for: to provide the key animators with guidelines as to how to draw the characters in order to reduce the burden on the animation director. In the end, it’s up to the animation director to make sure that the drawings are up to par. There might be some shots that they don’t correct, but for the most part they’re going to have to be in there making corrections to the close-ups of the faces (which are the most important thing from a character product perspective) to keep things uniform between the animators, because no two animators are going to draw the same way. Even animator as great as Atsuko Tanaka relates that she couldn’t draw the characters on model in Howl and caused sakkan Akihiko Yamashita a lot of trouble. Most of the time animators who do a better job of drawing characters on model will be given precedence in assignment of close-ups, if at all possible, while animators who are not so good at drawing but good at movement will be given action scenes where strict character resemblance isn’t as important. When an anime like Kaiji is so close to the original, the animation director/character designer is definitely the one to thank. If you do a real close comparison, no anime ever looks JUST like the manga. There is always some way in which the design has to be adapted to the medium of animation. That’s why, if an anime feels like it looks just like the manga, that’s testament to a good character designer who has created character designs that work in animation.

Also, you mentioned in passing that the animation director is often also the character designer. So is it that the exception to that ‘rule’ is when they hire a “star” character designer with a name, such as Yoshiyuki Sadamoto, Yoshitaka Amano or even CLAMP (in Code Geass, for example)? In those cases, I imagine they create the models and then some other guy works as the sakkan to keep their vision intact?

In many cases when they hire a ’star’ character designer of this kind, they will have the added step of getting someone to adapt their designs to animation. You’ll often find the credit “animation character design” after (some variation of) “original character design". Then, yes, the animation director is there to maintain consistency with those designs. It’s not necessarily that it’s a rule that the character designer be the sakkan; it’s just ideal, because they’ll understand best how to get the drawings right.

Another simple question is: how are the drawings corrected? What are the materials actually involved? Is it still all done in paper? When the sakkan makes the corrections, is it somehow layered on the original or does he simply erase what the key animator has done?

I don’t know whether it’s still done on paper or not, but traditionally it was done by placing a yellow ‘genga shuusei’ sheet over the key animation and only drawing what needed to be corrected onto the yellow sheet. So for example the sakkan might only re-draw the eyes of a character. The two sheets would then get sent to the inbetweener, who would superimpose the two sheets on the light table and trace an interpolation of the two incorporating the sakkan’s corrections. I imagine that most studios today have converted these basic tasks into analagous digital equivalents.

If you want to see this kind of material, it’s pretty easy to find sites with large collections of it online now such as:

http://cenbe.rubberslug.com
http://sensei.rubberslug.com
http://unkoer.tumblr.com

In the old days the only place I was able to find this kind of material was in the occasional Japanese animation magazine or specialzied publication. The Akira Archive was my first big taste of this kind of material in large quantities.

“Badly inbetweened animation can ruin a shot of perfectly good key animation". I’d love to see an example of this, if you could remember one. I think it would be very illustrative of the two different types of animation, that can so easily blend together for the common viewer as one single thing.

I don’t know one off the top of my head. I just know that most of us, myself included, take inbetweening for granted, but the inbetweens are what we see in the final product. We’re not seeing key animation. The inbetweeners produce the lines we see in anime. I’ve seen a clip of Shinya Ohira’s animation in Animatrix being traced, and it was really hard to trace. It required considerable drawing skill and intuition to create solid lines and flat forms out of Ohira’s erratically shaded grayscale pencil drawing, and I was impressed how different the inbetween looked compared to Ohira’s original genga, yet how it clearly did a good job of retaining its flavor. Most genga won’t be as demanding as Ohira’s, but it’s definitely a special skill that not everybody has.

I was reading an interview with Hitomi Tateno, the inbetween checker of most Ghibli films, and she relates how they assign inbetweens to inbetweeners based on the inbetweener’s skills, assigning important shots to the good inbetweeners – just like they were doing in the old days at Toei Doga, as I mentioned in the post on the Toei Doga seconding system. I doubt most production floors have this luxury, but the more enlightened and quality-oriented studios probably do. It goes to show that there is considerable variation between even inbetweeners.

Your summary of the varying extent of influence of the episode director is very much on the mark, so I don’t have much to add to that.

I don’t know much about the directing dynamics in Eva, though that’s a very interesting subject, but clearly Tsurumaki has to be subservient to Anno’s vision on that project. It would be worth reading an interview to find out about how their roles balanced out.

11/28/11 @ 20:07
Ben [Member]  

beldenotaku:

Thank you! Good luck with becoming an animator in Japan. It’s definitely possible. There are more and more foreigners working in anime nowadays.

Will:

You’re right. I misspoke. The dialogue timing is provided by the key animator on the time sheet.

Joojoobees:

Thanks! Glad it helped.

Mister X:

Yes, that’s the sakkan. It’s not that sakkans corect drawing to their own style on purpose; each sakkan merely attempts to correct ‘to model’ as best they can. But it just goes to show that there’s even variation between the drawing style of even high-level staff with good drawing skills like sakkans. This makes it easier to understand how the need for a chief sakkan came about. You should normally still see variation in drawing style between different sakkans in today’s anime, though maybe it’s not as glaring as it used to be. Many an anime fan got started following staff by noticing exactly what you have - that drawings vary from episode to episode - and starting to correlate each sakkan to their particular drawing style. (this can in turn lead to doing the same with key animators and directors) I’ve already mentioned this, but I love the anecdote so I’ll mention it again: Even Yoshinori Kanada went to Oh Pro to get an autograph from Koichi Murata because he liked Murata’s sakkan work on Attack No. 1!

11/28/11 @ 21:01