Initially daily but now sporadic blog about anime and world animation with a specific focus on the artists behind the work. Written by Ben Ettinger.
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« Space Dandy #16Space Dandy #14 »

Monday, July 21, 2014

07:39:00 pm , 879 words, 4020 views     Categories: TV, Space Dandy

Space Dandy #15

Dandy gets lured to a faraway planet by the prospect of partying with a hot alien, but winds up in the sights of a bizarre smile-hunting puppet.

This is one of the less slapstick episodes, which is not to say one of the more serious. Dandy doesn't have serious episode like Champloo did to contrast with the silly episodes. What Dandy has is weird episodes, and this is one of them alongside episode 11 about the library book. I don't mind weird, but the problem with this episode is that it doesn't quite gel. It doesn't have a clear thrust, and leaves a weak impression, even though technically it's quite well produced.

The writer is Nobumoto Keiko from episode 8 about Laika the dog. Her style is notably different from her junior and the show's dominant writing force, Kimiko Ueno. She's more old school, sometimes even a little stuffy, weaving complex themes into her stories rather than merely pumping out lighthearted comedy. When it works, it works, but here it feels like a bit of a jumble, combining things arbitrarily to suit the plot. The river of time in the climax seems a little underdeveloped and casually thrown in. The buildings appearing out of the river at the climax only felt nonsensical and forced, whereas a similar tactic in the climax of Mind Game was convincing visually and metaphorically.

The main alien in the show, the Ukelele Man, is one of the show's first dark characters, but he seems burdened with a bit too much thematic striving on the part of the writing. An entertainer trapped in a rigid, emotionless mask - a tragic creature, the only one of his race, he seeks out other creatures to steal their smiles. It's oddly portentious in the company of zombies and boobies. I was a little reminded of the pierrot episode of Cowboy Bebop written by Sadayuki Murai.

That doesn't mean the episode is horrible. It's enjoyable enough to watch. I like the idea of an episode about masks, and this episode is interesting in that it latches onto that strange disturbing tension that makes masks fascinating, with their frozen expressions of glee or fear or what have you. A spirit seems to inhabit them, which is probably why they've been used in religious rituals the world over.

The luxurious schedule of the show also guarantees that there will be no low-quality episodes. There's no struggling with deadlines here like in Ping Pong, and it shows. Everything is almost too well polished. The storyboard is by Masashi Ikeda, who I remember as the director of episode 29 of Votoms, although obviously he's gone on to do much work as series director for which he's better remembered now. It doesn't have a lot of quirks, but it gets the job done well enough.

I had a hard time figuring out what the crew were arguing about at the beginning, and then I realized it's a band called Shakatak that apparently only people in Japan still care about. The show manages to drum up some pretty obscure old music references every once in a while.

Yurkio Chiba sakkans the characters and Bones regular mecha man Eiji Nakata presumably handles the mecha. I'm quite fond of Yuriko Chiba's rendition of Dandy - more lanky and angular but with some great expressions, and an almost Lupin-esque elfin quality. There was some nice lavish surfing animation at the climax. I'm guessing Eiji Nakata himself handled this, since surfing robots were his thing in Eureka 7, and Yutaka Nakamura handled the Ukelele Man burning up at the end. His amazing rendering of the flames and quick timing are distinctive. My favorite bit in the ep was the handful of shots where the Ukelele Man comes alive from the tree, but I don't know who did those. Maybe Chikashi Kubota?

On the design side of things, we got another cool design from Takuhito Kusanagi - the mailman - but as usual it was on the screen for literally 3 seconds and had about as many drawings as the design. The Ukelele Man was designed by manga-ka Sho Tajima, who I remember back in the day from the manga Madara. There wasn't much animation in the episode that really brought the character alive in a way that did justice to the movement of a puppet. The opening scene probably moved him best. I would have liked to see some animation in the style of that old episode of Ninku with puppet-fu animation by Tetsuya Nishio.

Kiyotaka Oshiyama designed the guitar player at the beginning, Shingo Natsume the praying mantis aliens, and main character designer Yoshiyuki Ito the capybara alien. As usual, they throw in alien designs from a variety of people with very different styles into one episode, making for a pleasing variety. Hideyasu Narita of the art studio Kusanagi designed some very nice scenery for the alien planet. I'm assuming Takuhito Kusanagi is unrelated to the art studio, though I've always wondered about that. (their names are written differently)

The episodes often have special guest voice actors in addition to guest designers, and this time around the big name was Toshio "Ataru" Furukawa. He must be getting up there in years, but his voice is still youthful enough, if without the high-pitched intensity of his old role.

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2 comments

melchizedek
melchizedek [Visitor]

It actually took me a while to watch this episode. I didn’t get to it until after the Yuasa one, since I’ve been plagued with buffering problems on Hulu and other places.

Anyway, I do agree that this was a very weird episode. Specifically, the two concepts of the capybara alien and the time stream, and the Ukuleleman pursuing Dandy, don’t really seem to gel well. Since for the most part they seem uninvolved with one another.

It’s in the spirit of the show to toss up ideas willy nilly, but here I would have really liked to focus on one concept. The Ukuleleman storyline feels suited for a more slow and measured pace than was allowed here; at least a whole episode’s worth of legroom.

(I also found it a little weird that the Capybara, along with her kin, is the only alien on the planet we see unpetrified. It kind of furthers the disconnect there.)

This was a decent episode if a little awkward, and the climax in the time stream is a whole other episode I wish I could’ve seen elsewhere, possibly in a goofier episode. I just noticed that the fate of the present QT and Meow is left up in the air. Which is a little odd considering this is an episode where Dandy is actually focused on saving them (which in itself is a little odd).

07/31/14 @ 22:31
Ben [Member]  

Yeah, it felt like this episode might have worked better if they focused on the different, seemingly randomly-thrown-in, aspects a bit more. I quite liked the idea of the stream of time and it seemed like it deserved more exploration than a quick climax. It seems like a tough concept to execute in a way that would satisfy everyone.

08/11/14 @ 13:39