Initially daily but now sporadic blog about anime and world animation with a specific focus on the artists behind the work. Written by Ben Ettinger.
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Saturday, October 15, 2005

04:16:39 pm , 262 words, 967 views     Categories: Animation

Paradise Kiss 1

This text sounds awfully familiar for some reason. It's curious how there seems to have been a resurgence of interest in Midori all of a sudden. I've counted at least three different showings in different countries just in the last year.

Satoru Utsunomiya said he was directing an upcoming op a while back, and people are wondering if it might not be the new Eureka op starting soon... I was hoping it might be Noein myself.

Osamu Kobayashi's Paradise Kiss was even better produced than I'd thought it would be, even surpassing the quality of his first Beck episode. If there's one thing that is going to keep me from getting into this show it's Nobuteru Yuki's drawings (though he's a perfect pick for this material), but the parts that were done by Kobayashi (like the first minute, and little shots here and there) were just great, and overall it really felt like he'd molded it into his own creation again while still managing to keep close to the original. Impressive how he can do that. Watching the ending I thought Kobayashi had gotten a lot better as an animator, but then I realized it was Hiroyuki Imaishi and Yusuke Yoshigaki doing the animation, as I'd been told already but forgotten. Speak of the devil, I noticed Tokura Norimoto was in the op. I suppose those photos in the avant were taken by Kobayashi himself. I really liked that whole sequence. I wound up wishing the whole ep had looked like that and the ending, but he's too mature to do that.

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10 comments

Random person
Random person [Visitor]

Speaking of Eureka, episode 26 was really nicely animated and there were some really nice bits… Some parts were quite strikingly smooth (as in lots of frames)… How much money does Bones have, that the show in general has a relatively stable level of animation and yet they can have eps like these?

But Utsunomiya directing the Eureka OP… I guess it goes without saying that they probably wouldn’t want to keep his style of drawings…

10/17/05 @ 06:12
Ben
Ben [Visitor]

That’s why I was hoping more for Noein. But he’s just directing anyway, so I wouldn’t expect it to be his drawings. Utsunomiya has been kind of down about all the negative reactions to his Aquarion ep, which kind of ticks me off.

10/17/05 @ 09:12
Ben
Ben [Visitor]

I’m glad you convinced me to watch 26. The animation of Eureka in the air in the second half was stunning. I’m very curious to know how they did it, as it obviously couldn’t have all been done by one person. Perhaps Yoshida focused on fixing up the movement there.

10/17/05 @ 20:11
Ari
Ari [Visitor]

Hiiii, Ben. I’m stoked about a Paradise Kiss anime, I loved the manga. Thanks for mentioning it.

10/18/05 @ 04:45
Random person
Random person [Visitor]

I was particularly impressed by the bit where Eureka was being pulled by Renton into Nirvash. I really liked how they got the feeling of the wind pushing her up very well. And I liked the flying and also her clinging onto the edge of the mecha and then later falling off. There was an animator who I didn’t notice in the other eps, Hideaki Yoshio. I think he’s from Ghibli…

And as expected opinions are divided about Paradise Kiss. Seems like the manga fans aren’t all too happy.

10/18/05 @ 06:23
Ben
Ben [Visitor]

After FLCL and Eva, it felt like now they were putting in a bit of Nausicaa… and Eureka being pulled into Nirvash reminded me of a similar sequence in Macross ep 2. Still beautifully animated.

10/18/05 @ 09:54
gingersoll
gingersoll [Visitor]

I’ve noticed a fair number of ‘animation’ fans don’t care/say much about Nobuteru Yuuki’s work… Why? Is it because his personal drawing style sticks out too much? He isn’t the best when it comes to rendering life like movement, but he is quite talented–especially when it comes to moving shots with high levels of detail and lots of variation in line thickness…

10/18/05 @ 09:55
Ben
Ben [Visitor]

It seems fairly obvious that he’s immensely talented. It’s simply a question of personal preference. It’s just an approach to animation that doesn’t do much for me personally. I don’t think it’s because his personal style sticks out too much. Just the opposite, it feels like he’s got incredible capacity for adapting to whatever design is at hand and drawing it very faithfully and skillfully. I don’t think there’s anything ‘wrong’ with his work. I just prefer things that are a little more loose and free.

10/18/05 @ 10:17
Ben
Ben [Visitor]

Sup Ari. Great to see you here.

10/18/05 @ 10:24
h_park
h_park [Member]

I know this is a 2 years old post, but I want to answer Gingersoil’s comment. As a Yuuki’s fan, I’ve always liked his drawings. Nobuteru Yuuki is a very good character designer/illustrator whose drawing strength relies on high graphic detail of many static shots. It’s not that his drawing sticks out too much, but as an animator, his drawings don’t present excellent or interesting motions like Kobayashi or Imaishi. Primary job of animator is to create motion of drawn character. In his case, his character designs doesn’t get animated as much due to his level of drawing quality. His animation strength is to correct key animations from other animators to fit his highly detailed character models as much as he can, and that is very unique. In TV & OVA animations, character design/Chief Animation director’s work is only noticeable only in the first, the middle, and the last episode. In his case, he tries to put his work on just about all episode one way to the other. For him, the static shots. Recently, we’ve seen his own animations due to high demand to see more animated motion in the industry. I think he consciously knows that sleek drawings and fancy camera works alone won’t do tricks any longer. If you compare his 80’s and 90’s works against current ones, he simplified his style a bit in favor of better motion.

Comment from: gingersoll ]
I’ve noticed a fair number of ‘animation’ fans don’t care/say much about Nobuteru Yuuki’s work… Why? Is it because his personal drawing style sticks out too much? He isn’t the best when it comes to rendering life like movement, but he is quite talented–especially when it comes to moving shots with high levels of detail and lots of variation in line thickness…

10/29/07 @ 22:21