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Archives for: September 2015

Friday, September 25, 2015

05:54:00 pm , 4451 words, 11954 views     Categories: Studio: A Pro, Studio: Tokyo Movie, Studio: Oh Pro, Director: Isao Takahata, 1970s

Akado Suzunosuke

Hello world. I'm back again. Sorry for making a habit of disappearing. I thought I'd pick up where I left off by finishing a post I actually started about a year ago but never finished, about one of the classic Tokyo Movie/A Pro shows.

Akado Suzunosuke (1972-1973) is a bit of an oddity in the Tokyo Movie canon - neither cartoony gag comedy nor a spokon drama, but rather straight-up jidaigeki. Though not perfect, it holds up fairly well to viewing after all these years. It's a fun, if somewhat repetitive, rollicking samurai action adventure.

The production side benefits from work by luminaries like Yoshifumi Kondo, Osamu Dezaki and Hayao Miyazaki, albeit at an early stage in their development. The show is a product of the transitional years of the Mushi Pro/Toei Doga diaspora, when Tokyo Movie/A Pro captured many of these people briefly before they moved on to the gigs for which they're more well known.

Things often come in fads in anime - the sci-fi anime fad of the early 1960s gave way to the gag anime fad of the mid-1960s, which in turn gave way to the spokon fad of the late-1960s/early 1970s. Tokyo Movie is interesting for having originated some of those fads by taking a chance and doing something that went against the dominant style of the day at various junctures. Akado Suzunosuke is such a show, and was in fact quite popular and re-broadcast in Japan over the years, despite not having engendered as many copycats.

Based not on a popular manga of the day but rather an old manga from the 50s, everything about the show is a deliberate throwback, not just the samurai-era setting. The manga on which the anime is based was already old-fashioned when it was released in 1954. The manga was originally drawn by one Eiichi Fukui (and after his death Tsunayoshi Takeuchi) in a style that even in the day harked back to an earlier era of more simple storytelling, with six square panels a page, before Osamu Tezuka revolutionized things with his modernistic experimentation with narrative and paneling. So this anime is triply a throwback

The show's nostalgia factor is apparent right from the start with the show's opening theme, which opens with the big-eyed Suzunosuke striding down a country road. The naive, simple lyrics cheer Suzunosuke on and tell of his dreams to become Japan's best swordsman. The song is actually a children's choir version of the theme song from a 1957 radio drama of the manga released in the wake of the manga's popularity, written in the classic march style that was so popular in early 20th-century Japan right down to the war. (listen to the radio drama's theme song to see its similarity to the famous military gunkan march that makes an appearance in Grave of the Fireflies)

The radio drama adaptation of Akado Suzunosuke was such a huge hit that it was followed in short order by no less than 9 movies between 1957 and 1958, two TV series in 1957 alone, and possibly two other TV drama adaptations. Thus, although Tokyo Movie's version of 1973 was obviously aimed at children, it simultaneously must have played to the nostalgia of adults who would remember its story and theme song.

The 1957 TV adaptations paved the way for the advent of TV anime in a way that might not be immediately apparent - character toys and goods. Akado Suzunosuke was one of the first shows to be accompanied by a massive toy marketing campaign. That may have something to do with its surprising popularity. Shows like Tetsuwan Atom (and most later anime) would tap into that to help boost their popularity by synergy.

Tokyo Movie's Akado Suzunosuke wasn't the only nostalgia vehicle at the time. There appears to have been a kind of mini nostalgia boom in the early 1970s, with various old properties being brought back to life. It's possible that the idea to adapt the Akado Suzunosuke comic into animation was inspired by the 1972 revival anime adaption of the old hero show Gekko Kamen (1957) by the infamous Knack Studio.

In addition to being a jidaigeki, the show also functions as a hero show like Gekko Kamen, with Suzunosuke fighting his way up the ranks of the Kimento or Demon Mask Gang over the course of the show. On top of that, the show also functions as a spokon show, with Suzunosuke undergoing grueling training to master new techniques that will allow him to power up and defeat his increasingly skilled opponents. Thus, despite the different subject matter, Akado Suzunosuke is similar in spirit to the other Kajiwara Ikki spokon shows Tokyo Movie produced immediately before and after.

Cover of original manga (1954) / Poster for movie #4 (1957)

Akado Suzunosuke tells the story of a young man named Suzunosuke in bakumatsu-era Edo. As the theme song says, his goal is to become the greatest swordsman in Japan. His family name is Kinno, but his nickname is Akado after his red suit of protective kendo armor, passed down from his father. In the anime, the armor bears a bell insignia echoing his given name, but this appears to have been added in the anime version.

Suzunosuke was separated from his parents at a young age and raised in the countryside by a family friend. The anime skips this part and jumps right to Suzunosuke arriving in Edo to look for his parents and make his way in the world. He joins a dojo run by his father's friend and begins to learn kendo to follow in his father's footsteps. At the same time, he discovers a gang of bandits calling themselves the Kimento terrorizing Edo, and in his spare time sets about defeating them. This sets the series on its dual path: kendo supokon + jidaigeki hero show.

Just as the spokon shows are hardly purely realistic with the sports, Akado Suzunosuke is liberal with the swordplay. Suzunosuke must learn increasingly improbable waza that have him leaping 20 feet in the air and conjuring up whirlwinds to kill his enemies from across the room. His father was reportedly killed just before mastering the latter, the mythical "shinkugiri" or vacuum cut attack, so Suzunosuke's goal is to find his father's killer and master the shinkugiri attack. He'll need it in order to defeat the bosses of the Kimento.

The enemies fight back with fanciful and entertaining weapons - the first bad guy fires shuriken from his wooden leg. They play up the bakumatsu-era trappings by combining classic swordplay with western-inspired gadgetry. It's basically Japanese tradition valiantly fighting against takeover by the evil ways of the west.

This is a hero adventure in its purest form. The baddies are pure evil with no nuance or motivation, and all wear sneering oni mask to make their dispatch by the good guys impersonal. When the hero is trapped in a dungeon, how does the villain try to kill him? With a slowly descending spiked ceiling. Every fight is preceded by a lengthy introduction, and every line of dialogue by a bad guy is followed by a sinister laugh. There are exactly two women characters in the whole show: Sayuri, Suzunosuke's love interest, and his mother.

The show can't be divorced from its intended audience. When Suzunosuke becomes somewhat well known for his swordsmanship, the neighborhood kids play-fight in the streets pretending to be him and the Kimento. Those kids are the intended audience. Suzunosuke triumphs despite his small stature, and the message to the viewing audience is that they, too, can be heroes. The narrative was kept simple and Manichean no doubt to help kids project themselves onto the hero.

The show can grow a little tiresome and repetitive, as there really isn't much more to it than the baddie-of-the-week formula, but it remains entertaining to watch until the end, as they keep the narrative arc firmly in hand. The show has strong forward momentum from one episode to the next. The show also holds some surprises in store in terms of the animation and directing.

One curious thing about the re-release of this old show is that many of the episodes (at least episodes 9, 10, 12, 14 and 20) are censored. I know the word "kuso" in "kuso bozu" was censored in one episode, but I'm not sure exactly what words were deemed so offensive as to require being sacrificed to the PC gods on a home video release. I don't recall noticing any censorship on the DVD release of the much more potty-mouthed Dokonjo Gaeru from the same year. It's surprising that this should be deemed so offensive considering the far more extreme nature of many anime aired today.

The animation

"Murata-style BS" - self-reference by Oh Pro's Koichi Murata

The production side of things will be familiar from Koya no Shonen Isamu (1973-1974), which actually followed Suzunosuke in the same Monday 7 PM time slot on Fuji TV. The subcontractors that produced Suzunosuke are exactly the same, although the staffing is slightly different:

Oh Pro:Koichi Murata, Toshitsugu Saida, Satoshi Ohjima, Norio Shioyama
Junio:Takao Kosai, Tetsuo Imazawa
Mates:Koizumi Kenzo, Takashi Asakura, Akiko Hoshino, Michiko Takahashi, Shigeru Kogawa, Masafumi Kubota, Kazuyoshi Shimada, Akio Yoshihara
Neo Media:Keiichiro Kimura, Yasuhiro Yamaguchi
A Pro:Hideo Kawauchi, Hisatoshi Motoki, Yoshifumi Kondo, Nobuhide Toyokawa, Toshiyuki Honda, Tsutomu Tanaka, Eiichi Nakamura, Yuzo Aoki
Studio Z:Shingo Araki, Masami Abe, Satoshi Jingu, Yoshinori Kanada, Yukio Suzuki, Tsugefumi Nuno

The main difference is that most of the studios devoted more animators to Suzunosuke than to Isamu, with the exception of Neo Media and Junio. Yoshiyuki Momose was unfortunately not involved here because he went from working on Tensai Bakabon (1971-1972) to working on Dokonjo Gaeru (1972-1974). Junio's Minoru Maeda was still an inbetweener during Suzunosuke and was bumped up to key animation for Isamu. Perhaps most notably, Suzunosuke appears to be Yoshinori Kanada's first credited key animation. Of course, his style was obviously not developed at this point, so his work isn't identifiable.

Someone seems to have made a mistake and misspelled Kanada's (admittedly difficult to read) first name as Isuke 伊助 rather than Yoshinori 伊功. They apparently weren't very careful with the credits in this show, because Toshitsugu Saida 才田俊次 is also misspelled as Shun Saida 才田俊 in a few episodes.

Oh Pro is always playful about inserting references to themselves in the shows they worked on, and Suzunosuke is no exception, although overall I didn't spot as many in-jokes of this kind as in later shows. 80s shows were particularly rife with this sort of thing, but in the early 70s I don't think it was very common yet.

As far as stylistic differences between studios, all of the things I said for Isamu apply here as well. Oh Pro and A Pro deliver the quality work, Neo Media and Z deliver decent work, and Junio and Mates are mediocre. A young Yoshifumi Kondo did some of his earliest work on Suzunosuke. Episode 12 and 19 feature excellent drawings and action sequences presumably of his hand. Oh Pro's work unfortunately isn't nearly as good as it is in Isamu, perhaps because for the first two seasons Murata only does sakkaning without drawing key animation. I'm not sure why that is, but perhaps it's because he was busy working on Panda Kopanda over that period.

As for Neo Media, Keiichiro Kimura had just come from working on Tiger Mask over the last few years, so apparently he still had tigers in his blood, because all of the wolves he drew in episode 22 have what can only be described as tiger faces. As would be expected, the Neo Media episodes have some nice hustle in the movement. The running in particular is distinctive of Kimura.

The Mates episodes feature work by an animator named Shigeru Kogawa. This is the actual name of Tomonori Kogawa, who got his start at Mates before moving on to Tatsunoko and then founding his own studio, Bebow. He also worked on Lupin and Gamba's Adventure from Mates. The credits can be deceptive in anime in general and in particular in Suzunosuke, which is rife with misspellings or pen names or uncredited people.

The opening features a combination of new animation and bits taken from the show. There are two choice bits in the opening. The very first scene with Suzunosuke's rival shouting the show's catchphrase "Chokozaina kozome~ Na wo nanore!" is one of the best in the whole show with its gritty lines and dynamic movement. It feels like maybe the work of Yasuo Otsuka, who otherwise wasn't involved in the show. I wish we could have seen more action like this in the show. The shot later on of Suzunosuke falling into the water feels like Yoshifumi Kondo. He's animated similar sequences on several occasions, most notably one of the panda in Panda Kopanda struggling to hold his balance on the edge of water and finally falling in.

A Pro head Daikichiro Kusube is credited as Animation Supervisor for each episode, as he is on all of his supokon shows. In addition, Yoichi Kotabe is credited as assistant animation supervisor. These are separate from the sakkans for each episode, which always are from the subcontractor for that particular episode. Hence I'm guessing this means Kusube designed the main characters and "oversaw" the drawings (probably didn't do much correcting), while I'm guessing Kotabe designed and supervised the female characters. This would make sense, as these are exactly the same roles the two played on Toei's Kaze no Fujimaru (1964-1965) just before Kusube left to found his own studio. Kotabe had just joined A Pro in 1971 to work with Miyazaki and Takahata on Pippi, but wound up having to do other work instead, like this.

It's not entirely clear what Kotabe did in this capacity, but his style seems to jump out in the delicate drawings of the two female characters, so I'm left to assume he was the sakkan for those characters, superseding the subcontractor sakkan.

Mother in Akado Suzunosuke (1972) / Mother in Jarinko Chie (1981)

On the directing side of things, the series director is Shigetsugu Yoshida, the same as Isamu. Or more accurately, there is no actual series director credit in this show. The opening doesn't have any credits. All of the credits come in the ending. Shigetsugu Yoshida receives an "enshutsu" or episode director credit in each ending. I don't know whether this means his role evolved into a more supervisory one for the next show, or whether the credit merely evolved to more appropriately represent his role. The latter may be the case, as at the very least as late as 1974 on Heidi Isao Takahata was credited as the "enshutsu" of the whole show. Mushi Pro and Tatsunoko began using the "chief director" credit early on in the mid-60s, while Toei carried on with their tradition of having no chief director, only episode directors (who drew their own storyboards) until well into the 1970s. Tokyo Movie actually started out crediting a kantoku, and then reverted to enshutsu for a few years in the late 1960s/early 1970s, and began using the chief director credit in the early 1970s.

One of the most surprising faces in Suzunosuke is storyboarder Kuyo Sai, which is in fact one of the many pen names of Osamu Dezaki. Dezaki has some amusing pen names. This one is a homonym for "SA ikuyo" which means "Let's go". His other big pen name "Saki Makura" is meant to evoke "saki makkura" or "the future looks bleak". Dezaki's episodes aren't particularly identifiable as his style, but they do have a more dynamic feel to the pacing, with some of the more excitingly choreographed action sequences of the show. Many ex-Madhouse people worked at Tokyo Movie in the early 70s before (and even after) Madhouse was founded. Toshio Hirata even storyboarded a few episodes here.

But in terms of storyboarding/directing, it's the third season that is noteworthy and the highlight of the show. Shigetsugu Yoshida had just served as assistant director of Lupin III, on which Hayao Miyazaki and Isao Takahata famously served as the "A Pro directing group". So it's less of a surprise to discover that Miyazaki and Takahata were brought on midway through Suzunosuke to oversee the show, although I'm not sure why. They never receive a credit for this. Hayao Miyazaki receives a storyboarding credit on episodes 26, 27 and 41, but that's all there is to outwardly indicate their involvement. But watching the show, it's clear they were involved much more heavily than this.

The first two seasons plod along on familiar ground, but starting around episode 22 with the introduction of Seidoki, the "Bronze Demon" baddie, the Miyazaki-ness gradually starts ramping up over the course of the next few episodes, finally leading into episode 26 storyboarded by Miyazaki himself. The next ten episodes or so unfold as one continuous arc that feels like pure Miyazaki/Takahata. And then, as abruptly as their presence made itself felt, they seem to disappear and the old show returns to the fore for the last season.

Their presence makes itself felt in many ways. Most notably, all of the baddies from Seidoki on feel of Miyazaki's hand, including bat-man Onigomori in episode 27 and beetle-head Oniarashi in episode 28. I'm not sure, but it feels like Miyazaki himself drew them in each episode. Of course, he never receives any key animation credit in the show, so this is all conjecture.

Miyazaki-isms in the third season

Seidoki is a classic Miyazaki character, and the showdown between Suzunosuke and Seidoki in episode 26 is one of the great unseen Miyazaki episodes in his filmography. It's an explosion of Miyazaki-ness.

Seidoki is a veritable Swiss army knife whose suit of armor is bursting with surprising killer gadgets, including rocket hands, springy shoes, buzzsaw shoulders, flare fingers, and retractable axe arms. The chase sequence in the first half of the episode is easily the highlight of the show. The animation feels like it was done by Miyazaki himself, but I can't be sure about that. Miyazaki was almost certainly involved in some manner in the animation, but Yoshifumi Kondo is credited as an animator in this episode, and he is quite good at zippy action of this kind, so it's equally possible he's responsible.

The funny thing is that, even in episodes where the drawings are otherwise not very good, the bad guys alone seem to bear his imprint, as if he stepped in to correct just the baddies in each ep. It's through the baddies that Miyazaki was best able to express his unbridled creativity. The bad guys have all the coolest toys.

Miyazaki loves to place action in the sky and under water, and this is one of the first places you can see these settings in his oeuvre. He pushes the boundaries of scientific plausibility to the limit for the bakumatsu period, with a bat-shaped rocket ship and a dragon-shaped submarine.

You can spot many things in his "hikidashi" or drawer that he would later pull out on different occasions, including retractable claws of a kind that would be seen in the Cagliostro assassins and the robot winch in Conan; riding a kite like in the first Lupin III show; and the main character performing the amazing acrobatic feat of leaping onto the wing of a plane in mid-flight like in Conan, not to mention falling through that wing like in Sherlock Hound. Episode 31 even features a Lupin lookalike.

But the most obvious Miyazaki-ism is perhaps the strong female lead in the form of Nagisa. Nagisa is a character who goes completely against the macho samurai ethos of this story, in which only male characters are allowed to be intelligent and strong and lead, so she is clearly a product of Miyazaki's intervention. She reminds simultaneously of Cathy in Animal Treasure Island as well as Monsley in Conan, who in addition to being strong female leads are characters who began as enemies and ended up as allies.

Nagisa in Akado Suzunosuke (1972) / Cathy in Animal Treasure Island (1971)

Even apart from the out-of-place character of Nagisa, all of the imaginative gadgetry and complex machinations of this arc set it apart from the rest of the show in a way that suggests it to have been wholly devised by M&T. The arc culminates in a pitched battle on the Kimento's secret island lair that feels like a study for the climactic set pieces of most Miyazaki productions.

Takahata's presence is felt primarily in the complexity and expansiveness of the situation. Where before the stories were all about hissatsuwaza and nostalgic wanking over the samurai code, the third season suddenly breathes a greatly expanded world view, with action grounded in and dictated by a specific culture and geographic locale.

The first half of the arc is about a new formula for more powerful Dutch gunpowder that Suzunosuke fights to keep from falling into the wrong hands. The story shuttles between three different factions - the Shiranui clan, the Kimento and Suzunosuke and gang - as they fight over the formula in an effort to gain control of the country's capital. The analytical Takahata was uniquely adept at this kind of multifaceted storytelling. In the second half, a sea monster destroys ships carrying rice to the capital, leading to a rice shortage, but it's all being staged by the Kimento in order to make a killing on the price of rice. The episode has a strong sociopolitical commentary aspect, illustrating how you can control a populace by controlling their food supply.

Takahata the storyboarder is felt in particular in episode 38, which depicts the moral struggle of a young girl who has sided with the bad guys to survive but whose inner sense of justice bubbles to the surface in spite of her best efforts to suppress it. Sound familiar? It's not just the setup that reminds of a previous Takahata story, even the staging and timing of the dramatic moments seems reminiscent of Takahata. This is by far and away the most sensitively directed episode in the series. None of the other episodes are directed in a style even remotely similar to this, so I'd be very surprised indeed it it wasn't Takahata.

This suggests that Teruo Ishikawa is a pen name of Isao Takahata. Episode 25 features a dream sequence that seems prescient of Heidi, but the early Teruo Ishikawa storyboard episodes don't seem to bear his stamp. Perhaps, as in the case of Lupin III, they had to correct certain storyboards as best they could, but could only do so much, whereas later storyboards like episode 38 they were able to draw from scratch. Combined with the music by Takeo Watanabe, animation by Koichi Murata and designs by Yoichi Kotabe, certain moments in his episodes seem to point ahead to Heidi and indicate the direction in which Takahata was ready to go, given the right opportunity.

I'm not sure why it worked out that Miyazaki and Takahata were involved in Suzunosuke in such a strange location (just the third season), but perhaps they were busy working on Panda Kopanda up until that point and suddenly became free when that was done, and helped out Shigetsugu Yoshida to pay it forward for his work on Lupin III. Yoshida had joined Toei Doga the same year as Takahata, 1959, and left for A Pro two years before Takahata, so they followed a parallel course in these early years. Yoshida would of course go on to direct the non-Miyazaki Telecom episodes of Lupin III series 2 and serve as assistant director on Cagliostro.

So in summary, despite somewhat repetitive storytelling and spotty animation, this is a unique show for the period that remains surprisingly watchable thanks to interesting work here and there, with the big highlight being the Miyazaki-Takahata stretch of episodes 24-38(-ish).

Recommended episodes:

Episode 19 for Yoshifumi Kondo's animation
Episode 26 for Hayao Miyazaki's directing and animation
Episode 38 for "Teruo Ishikawa"'s directing and Oh Pro/A Pro's animation


赤胴鈴之助 Akado Suzunosuke
52 episodes, Tokyo Movie/A Pro, 4/5/1972 - 3/28/1973, Fuji TV, 19:00-19:30

Created by:武内つなよしTsunayoshi Takeuchi
Director:吉田茂承Shigetsugu Yoshida
Animation Supervisor:楠部大吉郎Daikichiro Kusube
Asst. Anim. Supervisor:小田部羊一Yoichi Kotabe
Art Director:影山仁Hitoshi Kageyama
Music:渡辺岳夫Takeo Watanabe

StoryboardSakkanKey Animators
1吉川惣司 Soji Yoshikawa香西隆男 Takao Kosai
塩山紀生 Norio Shioyama
小泉謙三Kenzo Koizumi
今沢哲男 Tetsuo Imazawa
才田俊次 Toshitsugu Saida
吉原章雄 Akio Yoshihara
2斉九洋 Kuyo Sai木村圭市郎 Keiichiro Kimura木村圭市郎 Keiichiro Kimura
山口泰弘 Yasuhiro Yamaguchi
3平田敏夫 Toshio Hirata香西隆男 Takao Kosai
塩山紀生 Norio Shioyama
香西隆男 Takao Kosai
今沢哲男 Tetsuo Imazawa
村田耕一 Koichi Murata
才田俊次 Toshitsugu Saida
4高市一男 Kazuo Takaichi小泉謙三 Kenzo Koizumi星野赫子 Akiko Hoshino
吉原章雄 Akio Yoshihara
湖川滋 Shigeru Kogawa
5岡崎稔 Minoru Okazaki村田耕一 Koichi Murata
河内日出夫 Hideo Kawauchi
近藤喜文 Yoshifumi Kondo
豊川信栄 Nobuhide Toyokawa
才田俊次 Toshitsugu Saida
大嶋聡 Satoshi Ohjima
6小林かおる Kaoru Kobayashi木村圭市郎 Keiichiro Kimura
荒木伸吾 Shingo Araki
山口泰弘 Yasuhiro Yamaguchi
アベ正己 Masami Abe
中村清 Kiyoshi Nakamura
7平田敏夫 Toshio Hirata香西隆男 Takao Kosai香西隆男 Takao Kosai
今沢哲男 Tetsuo Imazawa
8岡崎稔 Minoru Okazaki小泉謙三 Kenzo Koizumi
河内日出夫 Hideo Kawauchi
吉原章雄 Akio Yoshihara
星野赫子 Akiko Hoshino
本多敏行 Toshiyuki Honda
青木雄三 Yuzo Aoki
9斉九洋 Kuyo Sai村田耕一 Koichi Murata塩山紀生 Norio Shioyama
才田俊次 Toshitsugu Saida
大嶋聡 Satoshi Ohjima
10斉九洋 Kuyo Sai木村圭市郎 Keiichiro Kimura
荒木伸吾 Shingo Araki
山口泰弘 Yasuhiro Yamaguchi
安部正己 Masami Abe
神宮さとし Satoshi Jingu
11佐々木正広 Masahiro Sasaki小泉謙三 Kenzo Koizumi星野赫子 Akiko Hoshino
吉原章雄 Akio Yoshihara
湖川滋 Shigeru Kogawa
12平田敏夫 Toshio Hirata河内日出夫 Hideo Kawauchi本木久年 Hisatoshi Motoki
近藤喜文 Yoshifumi Kondo
13岡崎稔 Minoru Okazaki香西隆男 Takao Kosai香西隆男 Takao Kosai
今沢哲男 Tetsuo Imazawa
14斉九洋 Kuyo Sai村田耕一 Koichi Murata塩山紀生 Norio Shioyama
才田俊次 Toshitsugu Saida
大嶋聡 Satoshi Ohjima
15石川輝夫 Teruo Ishikawa木村圭市郎 Keiichiro Kimura木村圭市郎 Keiichiro Kimura
山口泰弘 Yasuhiro Yamaguchi
16平田敏夫 Toshio Hirata荒木伸吾 Shingo Araki神宮さとし Satoshi Jingu
安部正己 Masami Abe
17岡崎稔 Minoru Okazaki香西隆男 Takao Kosai香西隆男 Takao Kosai
今沢哲男 Tetsuo Imazawa
18斉九洋 Kuyo Sai小泉謙三 Kenzo Koizumi朝倉隆 Takashi Asakura
星野赫子 Akiko Hoshino
高橋道子 Michiko Takahashi
19石黒昇 Noboru Ishiguro河内日出夫 Hideo Kawauchi近藤喜文 Yoshifumi Kondo
豊川信栄 Nobuhide Toyokawa
本多敏行 Toshiyuki Honda
20斉九洋 Kuyo Sai村田耕一 Koichi Murata才田俊次 Toshitsugu Saida
大嶋聡 Satoshi Ohjima
21斉九洋 Kuyo Sai小泉謙三 Kenzo Koizumi朝倉隆 Takashi Asakura
星野赫子 Akiko Hoshino
高橋道子 Michiko Takahashi
22岡崎稔 Minoru Okazaki木村圭市郎 Keiichiro Kimura木村圭市郎 Keiichiro Kimura
山口泰弘 Yasuhiro Yamaguchi
23石黒昇 Noboru Ishiguro荒木伸吾 Shingo Araki安部正己 Masami Abe
神宮さとし Satoshi Jingu
24斉九洋 Kuyo Sai村田耕一 Koichi Murata才田俊次 Toshitsugu Saida
大嶋稔 Minoru Ohjima
25斉九洋 Kuyo Sai香西隆男 Takao Kosai香西隆男 Takao Kosai
今沢哲男 Tetsuo Imazawa
26宮崎駿 Hayao Miyazaki河内日出夫 Hideo Kawauchi近藤喜文 Yoshifumi Kondo
豊川信栄 Nobuhide Toyokawa
27宮崎駿 Hayao Miyazaki小泉謙三 Kenzo Koizumi星野赫子 Akiko Hoshino
吉原章雄 Akio Yoshihara
湖川滋 Shigeru Kogawa
28石川輝夫 Teruo Ishikawa木村圭市郎 Keiichiro Kimura
荒木伸吾 Shingo Araki
安部正己 Masami Abe
山口泰弘 Yasuhiro Yamaguchi
29斉九洋 Kuyo Sai河内日出夫 Hideo Kawauchi本木久年 Hisatoshi Motoki
近藤喜文 Yoshifumi Kondo
30岡崎稔 Minoru Okazaki香西隆男 Takao Kosai香西隆男 Takao Kosai
今沢哲男 Tetsuo Imazawa
31斉九洋 Kuyo Sai村田耕一 Koichi Murata村田耕一 Koichi Murata
才田俊次 Toshitsugu Saida
32斉九洋 Kuyo Sai小泉謙三 Kenzo Koizumi朝倉隆 Takashi Asakura
星野赫子 Akiko Hoshino
高橋道子 Michiko Takahashi
33小華和ためお Tameo Kohanawa荒木伸吾 Shingo Araki神宮さとし Satoshi Jingu
安部正己 Masami Abe
34石川輝夫 Teruo Ishikawa木村圭市郎 Keiichiro Kimura木村圭市郎 Keiichiro Kimura
山口泰弘 Yasuhiro Yamaguchi
35斉九洋 Kuyo Sai河内日出夫 Hideo Kawauchi本木久年 Hisatoshi Motoki
近藤喜文 Yoshifumi Kondo
36岡崎稔 Minoru Okazaki香西隆男 Takao Kosai香西隆男 Takao Kosai
今沢哲男 Tetso Imazawa
37小華和ためお Tameo Kohanawa村田耕一 Koichi Murata村田耕一 Koichi Murata
才田俊次 Toshitsugu Saida
38石川輝夫 Teruo Ishikawa河内日出夫 Hideo Kawauchi
村田耕一 Koichi Murata
田中勉 Tsutomu Tanaka
才田俊次 Toshitsugu Saida
本木久年 Hisatoshi Motoki
39小泉謙三 Kenzo Koizumi星野赫子 Akiko Hoshino
吉原章雄 Akio Yoshihara
湖川滋 Shigeru Kogawa
40斉九洋 Kuyo Sai木村圭市郎 Keiichiro Kimura木村圭市郎 Keiichiro Kimura
山口泰弘 Yasuhiro Yamaguchi
41宮崎駿 Hayao Miyazaki荒木伸吾 Shingo Araki安部正己 Masami Abe
金田伊助 Isuke Kanada
鈴木幸雄 Yukio Suzuki
42黒田昌郎 Yoshio Kuroda香西隆男 Takao Kosai香西隆男 Takao Kosai
今沢哲男 Tetsuo Imazawa
43石黒昇 Noboru Ishiguro村田耕一 Koichi Murata村田耕一 Koichi Murata
才田俊次 Toshitsugu Saida
44今沢哲男 Tetsuo Imazawa香西隆男 Takao Kosai香西隆男 Takao Kosai
今沢哲夫 Tetsuo Imazawa
45小泉謙三 Kenzo Koizumi
46今沢哲男 Tetsuo Imazawa木村圭市郎 Keiichiro Kimura木村圭市郎 Keiichiro Kimura
山口泰弘 Yasuhiro Yamaguchi
47黒田昌郎 Yoshio Kuroda河内日出夫 Hideo Kawauchi中村英一 Eiichi Nakamura
青木雄三 Yuzo Aoki
48石川輝夫 Teruo Ishikawa荒木伸吾 Shingo Araki安部正己 Masami Abe
金田伊助 Isuke Kanada
鈴木幸雄 Yukio Suzuki
49斉九洋 Kuyo Sai香西隆男 Takao Kosai香西隆男 Takao Kosai
今沢哲夫 Tetsuo Imazawa
50黒田昌郎 Yoshio Kuroda村田耕一 Koichi Murata村田耕一 Koichi Murata
才田俊次 Toshitsugu Saida
51小泉謙三 Kenzo Koizumi久保田正史 Masafumi Kubota
高橋道子 Michiko Takahashi
島田和義 Kazuyoshi Shimada
52吉田茂承 Shigetsugu Yoshida木村圭市郎 Keiichiro Kimura
荒木伸吾 Shingo Araki
山口泰弘 Yasuhiro Yamaguchi
安部正己 Masami Abe